ST-IT Limited

Coleshill Remembers The Great War.

Coleshill Remembers World War 1

As a free service to the World War 1 commemoration year, ST-IT Limited have created and are hosting a free database of Coleshill veterans. If you know of any Coleshill connected veterans (including those who returned), please feel free to add a record or add a note to someone already in the database.

View the Summary Roll of Honour HERE
Individual records and images can be viewed from the Summary Roll

If you have any questions or comments (or notice any errors) please get in touch by sending an email s.toon@st-it.co.uk. Similarly, if you have any photographs or images that you would like putting into the database, please let me know.

Simon Toon
Director
ST-IT Limited

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There currently 110 entries on the Coleshill Roll of Honour


Coleshill Remembers - Full Roll Of Honour - The Great War 1914-1918

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Name: Joseph George Adams
Year Of Birth: 1888
Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 3/9/1916
Notes: Private Joseph George Adams (service number: 17097), son of George and Mary Adams, was born in 1888 in Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland. By 1901 he was a resident of Coleshill living in Back Lane. He enlisted into the 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Private Adams died on 3 September 1916 and is buried at Delville Wood Cemetary, Longueval.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-03 20:24:00

Name: Ernest George Arnold
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: A Battery, 210 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery
Rank: Gunner
Date Of Death: 4/4/1918
Notes: Ernest George Arnold, son of Joseph and Sarah Arnold, was born in June 1898 in Coleshill and lived at 36 High Street. In 1915 he was enlisted into A Battalion, 210 Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Gunner Arnold (service number: 238697) died on 4 April 1918 and is buried at Bienvillers Military Cemetery. He was awarded the Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-03 21:33:55
Notes: Coleshill And The War. Gunner E. G. Arnold. In answer to an inquiry to the commanding officer, with respect to her brother, Gunner E. G. Arnold, who was reported missing in our issue of May 4th, was killed in France a few weeks ago Mrs. S. Morgan has received the following reply :- Dear Mrs. Morgan, I regret that my letter written to you quite a fortnight since has not been received by you. Your brother, I regret to say was killed by a shell about midnight on April 4-5th, the same shell burying two other men. A number of other dug-outs were in the vicinity, and every possible endeavour was made to extricate them as quickly as possible. The two men were brought out alive, but unfortunately, your brother was dead when recovered. It was a most unfortunate affair, as your brother had come through safely the worst time we have had during the recent fighting. Although your brother had not been long with this battery, he was very popular with all, and we mourn his loss. At times like these we can ill afford to lose such a strong healthy boy as he was. Please accept my sincerest sympathy, and that of the whole battery, in your berevement. Your brother was buried in the military cemetery at Bienvillers au Bois. Yours Sincerely, R. Yates, Major. Gunner Arnold would have been 20 years of age on Friday, May 17th. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, May 18, 1918
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-20 11:33:19
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 4th May 1918 GUNNER ARNOLD KILLED Mr and Mrs J Arnold, of High Street, Coleshill, have received an intimation that their son, Gunner Ernest George Arnold, R.F.A., was killed in action on April 4th in France. Before joining the army he was employed by Mr C. Messenger, butcher, High Street, Coleshill. Mr and Mrs Arnold’s three other sons are now in the army.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 22:05:29
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 10th April 1920 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM ARNOLD – In ever loving memory of Gunner E G Arnold, killed in action April 4th, 1918. Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sister. Shame cannot touch you now, Folly and sin, Into your silent house, Enter not in. Ever your name will be Gallant and bright, Lad whom the land of France Covers to-night.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-21 14:44:27

Name: James Aspley
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 1st and 3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/11/1914
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church, James Henry Herbert Aspley was born on 16th March 1895 in Winchester, Hampshire, to Henry Herbert and Annie Agnes Aspley. His father served with the Rifle Brigade from 1883, and as a result the family moved often. Henry was discharged from the army shortly after James was born, and died only four years later in 1899 in Birmingham. By this time the family were living in the Birmingham Workhouse and the three boys (James, Charles and George) were sent by the Birmingham Board of Guardians to the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill. James was baptised on 24th June 1903 in Coleshill, along with his two younger brothers. In 1911 James was living at the Catholic Working Boys’ Home, Moseley Road, Birmingham, and working as a lampmaker. James Aspley enlisted in the Worcestershire Regiment at Birmingham (service number 13266) on the 6th July 1913. He first served in Western Europe on 12th August 1914, with the 1st Worcestershire Regiment and then in D Company of the 3rd Battalion of the same regiment. Private Aspley was killed in action at Lindenhock on 27th November 1914, aged 19 years. His Battalion war diary for that day records ‘Some shelling. I killed, 3 wounded.’ He was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals and is recorded on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-28 21:06:32
Notes: information from army register of soldiers effects 1901-1929 James H H Aspley, a payment of £1 19 5 was made to Annie mother, brothers Charles and George and sister Annie received a payment of £1 19 5 each and a extra £5 was paid to mother Annie on 21 March 1919
Notes added by: anthony ward on 2015-03-19 19:49:18
Notes: Jimmy did not serve with 1st battalion - it was in Egypt when war was declared and did not reach France (Le Havre) until 9th November 1914. Jimmy crossed the Channel with 3/Worcestershire in August 1914. He died near Pack Horse Farm Shrine Cemetery just two weeks after 1/Worcestershire reached France with 8th Division. Although his battalion (3rd Worcs)served with various Brigades and under several Divisions, Jimmy died with 3rd Battalion.
Notes added by: Ken Wayman on 2017-11-12 13:27:12

Name: George Ernest Barber
Year Of Birth: 1893
Unit: 48th Coy, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 7/9/1916
Notes: George Ernest Barber was born in September 1893 in Coleshill. The son of George and Mary, he initially lived at 182 Park Road before moving to Blythe Road. On the 1911 census his occupation is listed as ‘gardener nurseryman’. Private Barber (service number 30860) enlisted into the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) at Nuneaton in November 1915. He died on 7 September 1915 and is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-03 22:56:33
Notes: In Memoriam. BARBER.- In loving memory of my dear and only son, Pte. G. E. Barber, of Blyth Road, Coleshill, who was killed in action in France on September 7th, 1916. He little thought his time so short In this world to remain, Nor that when from home he went He'd ne'er return again. No matter how we pray, no matter how we call, There's nothing left to answer but his photo on the wall. - Lovingly remembered by mother, dad, sisters and brother-in-law, Frank. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, September 8th, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-18 14:13:03
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 7th October 1916 DEATHS BARBER – Killed in action, in France, on September 7th, Private George Ernest Barber, only son of Mr and Mrs George Barber, Blyth Road, Coleshill. It is with regret that we record the death of Private George Ernest Barber, Machine-gun Section, 12th Royal Warwicks, who was killed in France on September 7th. The deceased soldier was 23 years of age, and the only son of Mr and Mrs George Barber, Blyth Road, Coleshill. Before enlisting in the army he was employed on the Midland Railway.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:53:13

Name: Arthur Oliver Basketfield
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/10/1916
Notes: Arthur Oliver Basketfield, son of William and Mary, was born in Coleshill in March 1897. He worked as a ‘waggoner boy’ before enlisting into the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers in 1915. At the time of his enlistment in lived at 24 Coventry Road, Coleshill. Private Basketfield (service number G/15389) was killed on 27 October 1916 and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-04 15:27:25
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 11th November 1916 THE LATE A. O. BASKETFIELD KILLED BY A SHELL The following letter was received by Mrs W. Basketfield, Coventry Road, Coleshill, on Sunday morning last, from the Field Post Office, France:- 2nd Royal Fusiliers, B.E.F. Dear Mrs Basketfield, - I write with deep regret to inform you that your son, Private A. O. Basketfield (15389), of this battalion, lost his life on October 27th. The part of the trench line where he was was very heavily shelled by the enemy, and one shell burst right in the trench, killing your son and some others immediately. There could have been no moment of pain for him. The battalion miss your boy, for he had won a name and place for himself, and was doing well. He will not easily be replaced, and to you his loss will be irreparable indeed. Please accept my warmest sympathy, and that of this battalion. Your boy was buried where he died, and a careful record of the place is being kept. All his personal belongings will be forwarded on to you. Yours respectfully, CYRIL MANNE, C.F. The deceased joined the army when he was seventeen years of age. After his training he was sent out to France, and has been abroad about fifteen months. He has been to Salonica, the Dardanelles, the Gallipoli Peninsula, Egypt, and back to France, where he gave his life for his country.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:05:07
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 11th November 1916 DEATHS BASKETFIELD – In memory of our dear son, Arthur Oliver Basketfield, who was killed in action in France, October 27th, 1916; age 20 next birthday. Mr and Mrs Basketfield wish to thank all friends for their kind sympathy to them in their sad loss.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 17:09:23
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 27th October 1917 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM BASKETFIELD – In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. Arthur Oliver (Curly) Basketfield, Royal Fusiliers, who was killed in action October 27th 1916, aged 19 years. Somewhere in France our dear one lies, In a grave we can never see, On Britain’s roll of honour There we know his name will be. -Sadly missed by Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters, and Brother-in-law.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 19:18:05

Name: Herbert Basketfield
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: 11th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/10/1918
Notes: Herbert Basketfield, elder brother of Arthur and William, was born in Shustoke in 1892. Enlisting in 1914, Private Basketfield served in the Kings Royal Rifle Corps and Leicester Regiment before being transferred to 11 battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers (service number 55599). He was killed on 27 October 1918, exactly 24 months after his brother Arthur and 12 months after his brother William. He is buried at Tezze British cemetery in Italy. The Coleshill Chronicle reported that Private Basketfield’s mother received a letter from E.J.Wells, regimental chaplain, stating: I want to assure you of my very earnest sympathy in the sad death of your son... ...on the 27 October. We waded through the Piave river and were creeping under the barbed wire when we came under heavy machine-gun fire. "B" Company rushed on at once, and soon the position was captured, and many prisoners taken, but Captain Stirling and many others were lying dead. Among them your son was one. I found his body shortly afterwards. We buried all who died together there two days later on the river bank, and I hope it may be possible to erect a monument there as a memorial to the gallant men who gave their lives to win the last battle, which has proved so great a victory, and help bring back peace to the world. God will reward them for their deeds, and may He comfort you in your sorrow.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-04 16:59:24
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 23rd November 1918 DIED FROM WOUNDS Mr and Mrs Basketfield, Coventry Road, Coleshill, received an intimation on November 20th that their son Pte. Herbert Basketfield, 11th Northumberland Fusiliers, was killed in action on October 27th, 1918, in Italy. His brother was killed on the same date last year. This is the third son Mr and Mrs Basketfield have lost in the war, and he is sadly mourned by his father, mother, sisters and brothers.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 08:56:43
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 1st November 1919 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM BASKETFIELD – In loving memory of our dear sons, Arthur Oliver, killed in action October 27th, 1915; also William Ernest, killed October 11th, 1916, in France; Bert, who was killed after wading through the Piave, in Italy, October 27th, 1917. They sleep beside their comrades, In soldiers’ graves unknown; But their names are written in letters of love, In the home that they tried to save. -Never forgotten by Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-04 18:48:02

Name: William Ernest Basketfield
Year Of Birth: 1894
Unit: 3rd battalion, Coldstream Guards
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 11/10/1917
Notes: William Ernest Basketfield (service number 13941), also son of William and Mary, was born in Shustoke in 1894. A member of the 3rd battalion, Coldstream Guards, Private Basketfield died twelve months after his brother Arthur on 11 October 1917. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:02:08
Notes: The Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, November 3, 1917 Mrs. Basketfield, Coventry Road, Coleshill, received information on Tuesday morning from the Colonel Commanding the Coldstream Guards that her son, Private W. E. Basketfield (No. 13941), of that regiment, was killed in action on the 11th October. The deceased joined the army as a regular in 1914. He was dangerously ill with double pneumonia at Windsor after a route march, and was in King George's Hospital for three months. He went out to France, and was wounded on September 29th, 1916, and was sent to Lincoln Hospital. He was wounded in ten places. He returned to France in May of this year, and he has been on active service till he met his death. His brother was killed on October 27th, 1916
Notes added by: DRunaghan on 2014-02-16 21:27:20

Name: Henry Birch
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 14th Battallion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 15/9/1916
Notes: Henry Birch was born in January 1887 in Curdworth. The son of Henry and Ellen, Private Birch moved to Lea Marston where he worked as a farmer before enlisting into the 14th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Private Birch (service number: 17021) was killed in action on 15 September 1916 and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:02:38

Name: Thomas Birks
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 1st Battalion Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 12/3/1915
Notes: Thomas Birks was born in 1891 in Longton, Staffordshire, to parents James and Sarah. His father was a coal carter and his mother worked as a potter’s burnisher. James had two older sisters, Mary Ellen and Elizabeth, an older brother, James, and a younger brother, Joseph. Sarah died in 1900, leaving James Sr as a widower with five children to look after. He died in 1901 and by 1902 Thomas and Joseph were living at the St Paul’s Home for Boys in Coleshill, Warwickshire. Thomas moved to the St Vincent’s Home at 102 Moseley Road, Birmingham, on 31st March 1906, and worked as a printer. From there he enlisted in the North Staffordshire Special Reserve at Lichfield in June 1908. Private Birks (service number 8979) completed his training between 15th June and 16th September 1908 and was then posted to the 3rd Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment on 18th September 1908. He passed classes of instruction in Mounted Infantry Duties. Private Birks was posted to the 1st Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment on the 20th September 1908. On the 20th February 1912 Thomas was appointed unpaid Lance Corporal with the 1st Battalion, and then on 12th May 1912 he was appointed to paid Lance Corporal. After just two months in this position he was reverted back to Private for quitting the Barracks. Upon the outbreak of war in August 1914 the 1st Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment were stationed at Buttevant in Ireland. From there they moved to Cambridge and then Newmarket, forming part of the 17th Brigade, 6th Division. Private Birks first served in France on the 10th September 1914 and his Battalion were involved in the First Battle of Ypres and also the Christmas Truce of December 1914. In March 1915 the 1st Battalion North Staffordshire Regiment were involved in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle (10th – 13th March). Private Thomas Birks was killed in action near Armentieres on the 12th March 1915 during the fighting at Chapelle D'Armentieres. He was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star with clasp, British War and Victory medals, and is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium. Private Birks is also remembered on the memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-02-22 17:59:03
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 19, Summer 1915 Thomas Birks came to St Paul’s on July 29th, 1902. He went to St Vincent’s on March 31st, 1906. His relatives wrote informing us he was killed in action. His brother Joe is serving in the Navy.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-02-22 17:59:54

Name: John Fred Blackshaw
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: 3rd Hussars and 1st London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 25/3/1918
Notes: Commemorated on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial, John (Jack) Fred Blackshaw was born on the 11th February 1897 in Macclesfield, Cheshire, to parents Fred and Hannah Maria. He was christened on the 11th April 1897 at Marton, near Congleton, Cheshire. His mother later married Peter Bloor and John and his mother lived with the Bloor family at Holt Hall, Nether Whitacre by 1911. John went to Coleshill Grammar School with his step-brother Percy Bloor. John Blackshaw enlisted at Nuneaton in the 3rd Hussars (service number 18838) and was transferred to the 1st Battalion London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers), service number 16624. He first served in France on the 17th August 1915. Private Blackshaw was killed in action on the 25th March 1918 and is remembered on the Pozieres Memorial, France. He was awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals and is also remembered on the Over Whitacre War Memorial, Warwickshire, alongside his stepbrother Private Percy Bloor.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-08-25 21:06:11

Name: John Henry Blewitt
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 53rd Battalion Sikh Regiment
Rank: A/Captain
Date Of Death: 22/4/1917
Notes: John Henry Blewitt was born in 1898. The son of Blanche and stepson of Archibald Blewitt, a solicitor, in 1911 he was living with them at Sherborne Cottage, Coleshill and was at school. Lieutenant Blewitt served in the 53rd Sikhs (Frontier Force) and was killed in action on 22 April 1917. Lieutenant Blewitt was mentioned in despatches and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:03:14
Notes: Mentioned For Distinguished Services. From the "London Gazette" last week we notice that included in the list of officers mentioned by Sir Stanley Maude for distinguished services is the name of Second-Lieutenant J. H. Blewitt (only son of Mrs. A. H. Blewitt and stepson of Mr. A. H. Blewitt, Sherbourne Cottage, Coleshill), who was killed in action while serving with the 53rd Sikhs Frontier force in Mesopotamia. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, August 17th, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-19 13:57:54
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 5th May 1917 DEATH OF LIEUTENTANT BLEWITT FROM WOUNDS RECEIVED IN ACTION It is with regret that we report the death of Second-Lieutenant J. H. Blewitt, Indian Army, who died of wounds received in action on April 22nd while serving with H.M. Forces in Mesopotamia. The young officer was 19 years of age, the only son of Mrs A. H. Blewitt, and stepson of Mr A. H. Blewitt, of Sherbourne Cottage, Coleshill. He was educated at Coleshill Grammar School and King Edward’s School, Birmingham, leaving the latter school in July, 1915. He left England in December, 1915, to join the Staff College, Quetta, India, after passing the Sandhurst army entrance examination. Passing out of the Staff College in July, 1916, he joined his regiment, the 53rd Sikhs Frontier Force, in Mesopotamia, at the end of December, 1916. Lieutenant Blewitt took part in the operations which resulted in the fall of Kut and Baghdad. He passed through a most trying experience in the fighting before the Sanni-yat lines of defence, and was actively engaged in the subsequent fighting right up to Samarra. Details of the manner in which this gallant young officer met his death have not yet come to hand. A fine type of England’s manhood, he has done his duty nobly, and given his life for King and country. His quiet, unassuming, but distinguished manner in all her undertook will be a happy memory to all who had the privilege of knowing him. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Blewitt in their great loss.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 08:49:17
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 5th May 1917 DEATHS BLEWITT – On the 22nd ult., of wounds received in action, John Henry Blewitt, 2nd Lieutenant, Indian Army. Dearly loved by his mother, Mrs Blanche Ada Blewitt, and by his stepfather, Archibald Hargrave Blewitt, of Sherbourne Cottage, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 09:31:33
Notes: Lieutenant Blewitt is also remembered on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 15:59:29
Notes: London Gazette 5th Sept 1916 Pages 8714-5 "The KING has approved the admission of the undermentioned Gentleman Cadets, from the Cadet College, Quetta, to the Unattached List for the Indian Army:- To be Second Lieutenants Dated 29th June 1916 John Henry Blewitt"
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-26 15:37:16

Name: Percy Bloor
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 28/6/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial, Percy Bloor was born on 26th July 1896 in Over Whitacre, Warwickshire. His parents were Peter and Elizabeth Bloor, and the family farmed at Holt Hall, Over Whitacre, in 1911. His father remarried and Percy’s stepbrother was John F Blackshaw. Percy and John were the same age and attended The Coleshill Grammar School together. Percy enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Shustoke (service number 17372). Private Bloor was killed in action on 28th June 1917 and is buried in the Mory Abbey Military Cemetery, France. He was awarded the Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 20:23:46
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 20th June 1918 DEATHS BLOOR – In memory of my dear son, Percy, killed in action in France, June 28th, 1917. We think of him in silence, No eye may see us weep, But deep within our inmost hearts, His meaning we’ll ever keep. -Ever remembered by his loving Father, Brothers, and Sisters.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 20:24:20

Name: Joseph Boneham
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 4th Battalion Middlesex Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/5/1918

Name: Joseph Reginald Brookes
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 59th Coy., Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 15/4/1918
Notes: Joseph Reginald Brookes was born in Princethorpe, Warwickshire in 1898, and christened on 1st January 1899 at Stretton on Dunmore, Warwickshire. In 1901 he was living with his parents Edward (a bailiff on a farm) and Sarah Anne, and his three older siblings at Oxford Road, Stretton on Dunmore. By 1911 the family had moved to The Dairy Farm, Maxstoke, near Coleshill, Warwickshire, where Edward was a farm foreman and Sarah Anne was a poultry attendant. \r\n\r\nJoseph enlisted in the Machine Gun Corps in Birmingham, and served with the 59th Company (service number 131835). The Machine Gun Corps was created on the 14th October 1915, so it is likely that he joined sometime after this date (he would have been only 16 years old when war broke out in 1914). The 59th Company of the Machine Gun Corps was formed at Grantham and moved to France on the 3rd March 1916. Private Brookes was killed in action on 15th April 1918 and is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium. He was awarded the British War and Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-08-09 21:24:31

Name: Walter Insull Burman
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 25/4/1918
Notes: Walter Insull Burman, son of John and Rosanna, was born in Birmingham in 1895. After living in Alvechurch, he and his family moved to Woodlands Farm, Bacon’s End. Private Burman (service number 523) was enlisted into the 2nd battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment in 1915. He was killed on 25 April 1918 and is buried at St. Venant-Robecq Road British Cemetery in France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:04:14
Notes: Killed In Action. Mr. and Mrs. Burman, of the Woodlands, Bacon's End, Coleshill, have received the intimation that their youngest son, Walter Insull Burman, was killed in action in France on April 25. He was 23 years if age, and joined the 3rd Birmingham City Battalion in 1914, and was attached to the 2/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The sad news was conveyed in a letter from the chaplain, in which it is stated that Pte. Burman was killed instantly by a shell. He had been wounded three times, but only once so badly as to necessitate hospital treatment in England, and that was early last year. He was sent to a Leamington auxiliary hospital, and afterwards was home on convalescent leave at Whitesuntide. He was educated at Coleshill Grammar School. Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, May 11, 1918.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-20 11:36:37
Notes: Private Burman is also remembered on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:00:19

Name: Benjamin Burrows
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 28/8/1917
Notes: The son of George and Sarah, Benjamin was born in Coleshill in 1897. Residing at 25 Coventry Road, Private Burrows was enlisted into the 11 battalion, Worcestershire Regiment and his service number is 16100. He died on the 28 August 1917 and is buried at Salonika Military Cemetery in Greece.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:04:46
Notes: Died Of Wounds We regret to record that Mr. and Mrs. Burrows, Coventry Road, Coleshill, have received official intimation that their youngest son, Pte. Ben Burrows who was recently reported wounded and lying in a hospital at Salonica, has died of his wounds. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, September 8th, 1917
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-18 14:11:28
Notes: FROM 11 Bn Worcestershire Regimental Diary - August 1917: "After a fortnight in Corps Reserve at Kirec (between 18th to 31st July 1917), the 78th Brigade at the beginning of August took over the extreme left sector of the British line near Smol, next to the River Vardar. The 9th Gloucestershire actually held the river bank, with the 11th Worcestershire on their right. The new position was held by the Battalion, alternating with the 7th Oxford & Bucks L.I. between forward and support trenches, throughout the Autumn and until the beginning of November. From 6th August, 1917 to 25th November, 1917, Colonel Barker was away sick. During this period Captain (A/Major) T. J. Edwards commanded the Battalion. There was little activity by the enemy, and there were but few casualties. During this period the 11th Worcestershire casualties in August were, 3 killed, 1 died of wounds, 1 officer Lt. G. K. Crocker, and 4 men wounded. September, Nil and in October, 6 wounded." Taken in light of the notice in the Coleshill Chronicle, it is likely that Pte Burrows is the one referred to as "1 died of wounds".
Notes added by: Simon Toon on 2014-02-18 15:55:56
Notes: Three Sons Dangerously Wounded. Mr. and Mrs. George Burrows, of Coventry Road, Coleshill, have been officially notified that two of their sons, in the Warwickshire Regiment serving in France, are dangerously wounded. Another son is now lying in a Hospital in Salonica. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, August 18th, 1917
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-19 13:56:15
Notes: CWGC Memorial See: - http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/624420/BURROWS,20B Find A Grave Memorial# 56565040 (See: - http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=burrows&GSfn=b&GSbyrel=all&GSdy=1917&GSdyrel=in&GScntry=11&GSob=n&GRid=56565040&df=all&
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-03-05 10:35:39
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 10th October 1914 COLESHILL AND THE WAR Mrs Burrows of Coventry Road, Coleshill, has heard this week that her son Charles, who is in the Royal Field Artillery, and came with a contingent from Canada about a month ago, is now off to the front. Her other soldier son, Ben, writes from the Worcester Regiment Camp at Sherrington, Wiltshire, that he is happy in his present quarters and going along well.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-08-26 20:52:56

Name: Edward Cahill
Year Of Birth: 1889
Unit: 1st/8th Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 9/12/1916

Name: Thomas Caldicott
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 5/8/1917
Notes: Thomas Caldicott was born in 1892 in Polesworth to John and Mary. By 1901 Private Caldicott was living in Gilson and by 1911 was working as a platelayer. He was enlisted into the 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards (service number 17322) in 1915, one year before he married Dorothy Baugh in April 1916. He was killed on 5 August 1917 and is buried in Bleuet Farm Cemetery in Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:05:15
Notes: The Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, August 25, 1917. Coleshill Soldier Killed In Action Officers' Sympathetic Letters. It is with regret that we record the death of another Coleshill soldier - Private Thomas Caldicott, signaller Coldstream Guards, and eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Caldicott, of Gilson, Coleshill, who was killed on the 5th inst., in France Pte Caldicott was 26 years of age , and prior to the war was in the Birmingham City Police Force, E Division, for 6 years. He enlisted in November 1915, and went to France in December, 1916. He was married in April, 1916. The following letter was recieved by Mrs. Caldicott from the officer of the platoon: "I am more than sorry to have to tell you that T. Caldicott, Coldstream Guards, was killed coming out of the trenches on the night of 5th and 6th August. A shell landed on the road in the centre of the platoon, and a fragment struck Caldicott and several others killing him instantly. He was an exceedingly fine soldier, and is a great loss." The Sergeant also wrote:" I feel it my duty to write you a few lines of sympathy on behalf of the comrades of the late Pte. Caldicott, who fell in action on the 5th of August. He was a good soldier , who knew no fear , a cheery companion, and liked by all. One and all send their deepest sympathies in your sad bereavement." Mr. and Mrs. Caldicott's two other sons are in the army . The second son, now at home on leave, was badly wounded and has been in hospital for 13 months, and will enter a convalescent camp. The youngest son enlisted in the Coldstream Guards, and is now in France.
Notes added by: DRunaghan on 2014-02-16 21:29:36
Notes: Thomas left a Widow Dorothy 'Kate' Caldicott (nee Baugh) they had been married in Meriden RD in Qtr2 1916, no children are known of that union. His Widow re-married in Aston Rd in Qtr 3, 1919 to Mr James H Nurse. 3 other local Caldicott's also gave their lives in the conflict all were 1st cousins 1x removed to Thomas. Two of Minworth and are both commemorated also upon their Fathers Grave at Curdworth. Walter John who died 27 May 1918 and is commemorated at Soissons Memorial, and his brother Stephen who died 14 July 1916 and is commemorated at the Abert Communal Cemetery Extension. The 3rd George (DCM) of Yardley, died at Messines Ridge and is commemorated at Ypres (Ieper), West Flanders (West-Vlaanderen), Belgium.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-21 23:24:12
Notes: my late uncle The War Diary records “30 July 1917 - Battalion moved into the line by battalions during the evening. 31 July 1917 - Zero hour 3.15am. Our barrage came down in German line. 1st Battalion, Scots Guards and 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards took the Blue Line and pushed on to the Black Line where some resistance was encountered and Number 3 Company, 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, coming forward with the leading wave of the battalion, rendered material assistance in clearing the enemy. Number 2 Company were employed in ‘mopping up’ behind the 1st Battalion, Scots Guards and 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards. These two battalions remained in and consolidated the Black Line. The 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards formed up behind the Black Line and with the 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards on the right advanced to attack the Green Line which was obtained within 40 minutes of their advance from the Black Line. There the battalion dug in under heavy shell fire. The casualties were comparatively slight, 1 officer was killed and 4 wounded. Other ranks, 22 killed, 140 wounded and 17 missing. 1 August 1917 - Battalion remained in the Green Line. Relieved by 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards at night. Relief completed by 11am. Battalion went to bivouacs in the forest area. 2 August 1917 - Resting. 3 August 1917 - Resting. Battalion relieved 2nd Battalion, Irish Guards in the Blue and Green lines by night. Weather still bad. Battalion went up by train from forest area to Elverdinghe. 4 August 1917 - Raining all day. 5 August 1917 - Fine. Battalion relieved by 4th Grenadier Guards. Battalion moved by motor buses to Herzeele area, billets just north of the village, arriving at 3.30am 6.8.17. Casualties during last tour; Other ranks 3 killed, 9 wounded.”
Notes added by: david callender on 2014-04-13 19:15:33
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 7th August 1920 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM CALDICOTT – In loving memory of our eldest son, Tom, killed in action, August 5th, 1917. Shall we not offer our best and highest, When duty calls can we forbear to give. This be thy record, where in peace thou liest, He gave his life, that England’s soul might live.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-05-30 12:34:49

Name: Thomas Carroll
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 21/6/1915
Notes: Thomas Carroll was born in Middlesborough in 1895, the son of Mrs Margaret Carroll. In 1902 he was sent to live at the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, where he stayed until 1908. He then moved to Chigwell in London and subsequently enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment at Stratford, Essex. Private Carroll had enlisted as a Regular Soldier prior to the outbreak of war, and was stationed with his Battalion in Egypt in August 1914. The Battalion embarked for Britain on the 13th September 1914 and after arriving in Southampton, moved to Winchester to join the 23rd Brigade, 8th Division. They were mobilised for war and landed at Le Havre on the 6th November 1914. The 2nd Battalion Devonshire Regiment took part in the Christmas Truce of 1914, the Battle of Neuve Chapelle (10th-13th March 1915) and the Battle of Aubers (9th May 1915). Private Carroll (service number 9173) died from wounds on 21st June 1915 and is buried in the Rue-du-Bacquerot (13th London) Graveyard, Laventie, France (Row G, Plot 7). He was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals, and is also remembered on the Memorial in the Church of the Sacred Heart and St Teresa, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-26 13:55:21
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal, No.21, Winter 1915 “Thomas Carroll came from Middlesborough to St Paul’s in February 1902. The Sisters remember him as an excellent boy. He left St Paul’s for Chigwell in November 1908. From Chigwell he joined the 2nd Devon Regiment, and early in the war went to the front. In one of his letters written from the front he wrote: ‘When we go to town we can receive the Sacraments of Confession and Holy Communion, which I myself take great advantage of.’ His brother James, who has been out since the war began, visited St Vincent’s and told us of Tom’s death in ‘the great push.’ RIP.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-05-09 17:04:27

Name: Ernest Edward Chamberlain
Year Of Birth: 1886
Unit: 1st/6th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/8/1917
Notes: Ernest Edward Chamberlain was born in March 1886 in Coleshill. The son of Charles and Mary, he lived at several addresses on Coleshill High Street and worked as a platelayer before he enlisted in 1915. A private in the 1st/6th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment he was killed in action on 27 August 1917 and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.
Notes added by: Stoon on 2015-02-09 20:13:52
Notes: Mrs. Chamberlain, of Lower High Street, Coleshill, has received official intimation that Private E. Chamberlain, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, previously reported missing on August 27th, was killed in action on that date. Private Chamberlain was employed with Mr. J. T. Tuckley, ironmonger, Coleshill, prior to joining the army. On Thursday morning Mrs. Chamberlain received further intimation that another son, Private Harry Chamberlain, was dangerously wounded in action a few days ago, and is now in a military hospital in France. Mrs. Chamberlain will have the deepest sympathy of many friends in her hour of sorrow. Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, November 3, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-18 14:09:53
Notes: Local Soldiers Reported Missing Private E. E. Chamberlain, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, third son of Mrs. Chamberlain, Lower High Street, Coleshill, is officially reported as missing since August 27th. He has been out in France fourteen months. Prior to the war he was employed with Mr. J. T. Trickley, ironmonger, Coleshill. His brother Private Harry Chamberlain, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is also in France. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, September 29, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-20 11:40:05

Name: Francis Comerford
Year Of Birth: 1877
Unit: 6th Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 3/5/1917
Notes: Private Comerford is remembered on the War Memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill. Francis (Frank) Comerford was born in 1877 in London, the second youngest son of Richard Patrick (a tailor) and Elizabeth Comerford. In 1881 the family were living at 11 Hawthorn Street, Islington. Frank had 6 older siblings. The family fell on hard times and from October 1882 Elizabeth and her youngest children were admitted to the Hackney Union Workhouse several times. The children were sent from there to Brentwood School each time, which was overseen by the Hackney Union. The school was a large residential school set up for the care and education of pauper children whose parents were in the Hackney workhouse. At this time Elizabeth was listed as a married woman and it is not clear where her husband Patrick was. In 1889 Frank’s father Patrick died and family circumstances became very difficult. Elizabeth and her two youngest children, Frank and Patrick somehow ended up in the Aston Union Workhouse in Birmingham. From there Frank and Patrick were sent permanently to the St Paul’s Home in Coleshill on the 9th February 1889. Elizabeth was still in the workhouse in 1891 where she is listed as a pauper working as a vest maker. Frank remained in Coleshill for 5 years, being discharged from St Paul’s to lodgings on the 30th October 1894. Frank’s whereabouts following his discharge are not clear, although his younger brother Patrick settled in the Birmingham area and in 1911 was living with his wife and 5 children at The Gables, Birchall Street, Birmingham. Sometime after the outbreak of war Frank enlisted in Bromley, Kent, into the 6th Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment, service number G/11059, giving his place of residence as King’s Cross, London. Private Comerford did not serve in a theatre of war until at least early 1916. The 6th Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent) Regiment came under command of 37th Brigade in 12th (Eastern) Division. They landed at Boulogne in June 1915 and it is likely that Private Comerford joined them as part of a group of re-enforcements sometime in 1916. On 3rd May 1917, the 6 Queens Own were in the trenches in the vicinity ironically called Happy Valley, approximately 5 miles east of Arras. The battalion war diary for the day details the action as follows and is quite short and to the point: "At 2.30am Battalion moved up into position for the attack. B & D Coys in support of the 7th East Surrey Regt, A & C Coys in support of 6th Bn The Buffs. Attack on BROWN LINE started at 3.45am. Attack came under heavy machine gun fire and was repulsed. The Bn not called on for support. Orders received in late afternoon for Bn to capture BROWN LINE starting at 9.45pm. The attack was unsuccessful being beaten back by intense machine gun fire from both flanks and from the front. Casualties: 12 Officers 250 ORs. Private Comerford was killed in action on the 3rd May 1917 and is now buried in Plot 3, Row D, Grave 7 of the Cagnicourt British Cemetery. His brother Patrick was given as his next of kin in his military will. Private Comerford was posthumously awarded the British War and Allied Victory medals. He was 40 years old.
Notes added by: SFT on 2017-05-05 16:15:05

Name: Cyril Henry Coombs
Year Of Birth: 1886
Unit: Worcester Yeomanry
Rank: Corporal
Date Of Death: 23/4/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial, Cyril Henry Coombs was born in 1886 in Saltley, Birmingham, to parents Samuel William (a School Master) and Harriet Coombs. Cyril attended the Coleshill Grammar School, and in 1911 was working as an auctioneer in Worcester. He enlisted in the Worcester Yeomanry (The Queen’s Own Worcestershire Hussars) at Worcester, service number 2209. Private Coombs first served in Egypt on 24th April 1915, and was later made Corporal. He was killed in action on 23rd April 1916 in Egypt, and is remembered on the Jerusalem Memorial, Israel & Palestine. Corporal Coombs was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-06 13:57:43
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 6th May 1916 MIDLAND YEOMAN MISSING Official notice has been received that Corporal Cyril H Coombs, of a Midland Yeomanry Regiment, has been missing since Easter Sunday. The only surviving son of Mr S W Coombs JP, Vice-Principal of Saltley Training College, he rejoined the Yeomanry on declaration of war in August 1914, and served in Gallipoli and Egypt. He was educated at Coleshill Grammar School, and upon leaving entered Lloyds Bank, Colmore Road, Birmingham. For some years he has been an auctioneer at Worcester.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-06 13:58:15

Name: Frederick William Cornock
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: 2nd/5th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 26/2/1917
Notes: Frederick William Cornock was born in Coleshill in 1892 to Benjamin and Emma Louise Cornock. In 1901 the family were living on High Street, Coleshill, and Frederick’s father was working as a House Painter. Frederick attended the Parochial School on Parkfield Road and after leaving there worked as a Grocer’s assistant. The family attended the Congregational Church, Park Road, Coleshill. They left Coleshill and moved to Handsworth, Birmingham, in 1912. Frederick enlisted in Birmingham the 2nd/5th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment after the outbreak of war (service number 20256). The Battalion was formed in Birmingham during October 1914 and first landed in France on 21st May 1916. Private Cornock was killed in action in Western Europe on the 26th February 1917, aged 26. He is buried in the Rosieres Communal Cemetery Extension, France, Plot III, Row D, Grave 6. He was awarded the Allied Victory and British War medals. Private Cornock is remembered on the List of Old Boys of the Parochial School in the Old Market Hall, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-02 22:30:27

Name: Alexander Basil Crawford
Year Of Birth: 1891
Unit: Lincolnshire Regiment and 17th West Yorkshire Regiment
Rank: Captain
Date Of Death: 10/5/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial, Alexander Basil Crawford was born in Coleshill on 24th May 1891. His parents were Dr Alexander David Crawford (a medical practitioner) and Etty. In 1901 the family lived at 64 High Street, Coleshill. Alexander attended the King Edward’s School, Birmingham, and Coleshill Grammar School. He was a talented cricketer, both as a right-handed batsman and a right-arm fast-medium bowler, playing at county level for both Warwickshire and Nottinghamshire during 1911-1912. By this time the family had moved to Skegby, Nottinghamshire, and Alexander was working as an articled solicitor’s clerk. Private Crawford enlisted in the Lincolnshire Regiment (service number 2432) and first served in France on 31st January 1916. He was transferred to the 17th West Yorkshire regiment where he was made Captain. Captain Crawford was killed in action on the 10th May 1916 in the Neuve Chapelle-Ferme du Bois Sector. The Divisional History for the 10th May 1916 reads “A few quiet days followed, during which Captain A B Crawford and Captain G S de Williams were unfortunately killed in the line by shell burst.” Captain Crawford is buried in the St Vaast Post Military Cemetery, Richebourg-L’avoue, France. He was awarded the Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-19 16:53:11

Name: William Crewe
Year Of Birth: 1893
Unit: 9th Battalion Devonshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 1/7/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. William Patrick Crewe was born in Birmingham in 1893, son of Mrs C Crewe. In 1901 he was living at the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill. He enlisted in the 9th (Service) Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment at Birmingham and first served in France on 27th July 1915. Private Crewe (service number 12121) was killed in action on 1st July 1916 during the capture of the village of Mametz. He is buried in the Devonshire Cemetery, Mametz, France. Private Crewe was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-26 14:17:08
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No.23, Summer 1916. We regret very much that Quartermaster Sergeant Peter Pattison and William Crewe have fallen in action, and that Private Daniel McGregor has died at the front after an illness. Willie Crewe came to St Paul’s Home in January, 1897. The sisters there retain a very pleasant recollection of him. He left for St Vincent’s Home on April 27th, 1908. He joined the Devons at the outbreak of war.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-21 17:14:00

Name: Charles Croydon Crooke
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: Labour Corps
Rank: Lieutenant
Date Of Death: 22/11/1918
Notes: Charles Croydon Crooke was born on 13 June 1898 in Bromsgrove. Charles lived with his father, Charles Gibbins Crooke, a pharmacist, and his mother Florence on Coleshill High Street. Lieutenant Crooke was enlisted into the Labour Corps and died on 22 November 1918 in Ipswich, eleven days after the armistice. He is buried in Coleshill Cemetery.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-05 10:20:54
Notes: Death of Lieutenant Crooke, An "Old Boy" of Coleshill Grammar School. It is with deep regret that we have to record the death in Ipswich Military Hospital, from pneumonia, of Lieut. Charles Croydon Crooke, of the Labour Corps., only son of Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Crooke, of High Street, Coleshill. The attack was serious when it came on about three weeks ago, and necessitated his removal to the Military Hospital. His parents were advised, and Mrs. Crooke made the journey, but a decided improvement took place, and Mrs. Crooke returned home a fortnight ago with the hope her son was on the way to recovery. On Thursday of last week, however, he had a serious relapse, and death took place on Friday. This promising young officer was only 20 years of age. He joined the ranks of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in January 1915, gained his commission in March, 1917, and was appointed to a Labour Corps. He had recently been recommended for promotion, and was waiting for it to be gazetted before coming home on leave when his illness came on. Lieutenant Crooke was educated at Coleshill Grammar School, and joined H.M. Forces immediately on completion of his education. He was a fine all-round sportsman, and was always a prominent competitor and prize winner at the School Annual Sports. Much sympathy is felt for the family in their bereavement. The following letter from his Captain was sent to Mr. and Mrs. Crooke:- "Ipswich 24th Nov., 1918. "I cannot tell you how grieved we are at the sad ending of your son's illness. It seems so particularly pathetic after the way he was recovering so well, indeed, the hospital had informed me that he would be leaving there in a few days, and would be going on leave when stronger: and I was very much upset to hear he had a relapse. He is missed so much in the office, where everyone liked him, and where he had always been so helpful to me. He was clever and capable, and when I was away for a week in September took full charge of the company, numbering over 800 men. I must not expect to get another officer like him. P.S. - His promotion is not through; it takes so long over these things." The funeral took place at Coleshill, on Thursday afternoon. Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, November 30, 1918
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-17 22:24:17
Notes: Lieutenant Crooke is also remembered on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:01:00

Name: Thomas James Dabbs
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: 11th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 16/7/1916
Notes: Thomas James Dabbs was born in Coleshill in December 1892. In 1901 Private Dabbs was living at 97 High Street with his parents Thomas and Jane, and by 1911 was working as a baker. He enlisted in 1915 into the 11th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 12639, and was killed in action on 16 July 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:06:09
Notes: By 1911, the census shows that Thomas' father had died and he was living in Coleshill with his widowed mother, sister Florence and younger brother George.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-18 13:21:32
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 12th August 1916 Private Thomas James Dabbs, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 16th, in France. Intimation from the War Office was received during the week. Private Dabbs enlisted soon after the war commenced, and was formerly employed with Mr Thomas Upton, baker, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 15:59:19
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 17th July 1920 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM DABBS – In loving memory of Private Thomas James Dabbs, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action July 16th, 1916. Gone, but not forgotten by his Brother and Sister.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-21 14:51:40

Name: John Darcy
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 1st Battalion Border Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 28/8/1915
Notes: John Darcy was born in 1887 in Middlesbrough, Yorkshire. In 1899 John and his younger brother Thomas (born 1894) were sent to the St Paul’s Home for Boys in Coleshill, Warwickshire, by the Middlesbrough Board of Guardians. It is not clear what happened to their parents or younger siblings. John and Thomas were baptised in Coleshill on the 1st November 1899. At the age of 14 in 1901, John was a student and half-time carpenter at St Paul’s. In December the same year he moved to the St Vincent’s Home on Moseley Road, Birmingham, where he stayed for two years. After leaving St Vincent’s John returned to Middlesbrough where he worked as a labourer, living at 14 Durham Place. On the 23rd August 1904 he enlisted at Richmond with the 4th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment aged 17 years 5 months. His enlistment papers describe him as 5 foot 3 and 3/8 inch tall, with a fresh complexion, grey eyes and dark brown hair, service number 5993. He completed the maximum 49 days service as a Militiaman and officially joined the Yorkshire Regiment on 28th August 1905, service number 8170. Private Darcy gave his next of kin as younger brothers Patrick, living at 8 Durham Place, Middlesbrough, and Thomas, still living at St Paul’s Home in Coleshill, and a sister who lived in Canada. Private Darcy’s time with the Yorkshire Regiment included service in Rawalpindi in India. By 1911 Private Darcy had transferred to the 1st Border Regiment and was stationed at Sale Barracks in Rangoon, Burma. Upon the outbreak of war the Battalion were still in Burma, stationed at Maymyo. In December 1914 they embarked from Bombay, landing at Avonmouth, England on the 10th January 1915. From here they moved to Rugby and joined the 87th Brigade of the 29th Division. On the 17th March 1915 the Battalion was mobilised for war and sailed from Avonmouth via Egypt and Mudros, landing at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, on the 25th April 1915. During the fighting in the Gallipoli Campaign Private Darcy was wounded, and died from his wounds on the 28th August 1915. He is buried in Plot 5, Row F, Grave 3 of Hill 10 Cemetery, Turkey. Private Darcy was posthumously awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals and is remembered on the War Memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-28 08:28:41

Name: Francis Gerald Vane Smith de Heriz
Year Of Birth: 1882
Unit: 3rd Coy., 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 15/10/1917

Name: Walter Thomas Deeman
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 16th (Royal Devon and Royal North Devon Yeomanry) Battalion, Devonshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 2/9/1918
Notes: Walter Thomas Deeman was born in Coleshill in October 1896. By 1911 Private Deeman was living on Coleshill High Street with his parents, Thomas and Annie and his siblings. His father was a domestic gardener. Private Deeman, service number, 291219, enlisted in the 16th (Royal Devon and Royal North Devon Yeomanry) battalion, Devonshire Regiment and was killed on 2 September 1918. He is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:06:35
Notes: Baptised at Coleshill 11 Oct 1896
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-03-04 16:48:38
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 5th October 1918 COLESHILL AND THE WAR Private W. Deeman, 291219, 16th Devon Regiment, is reported missing since September 2nd, while on service in France. Private Deeman is the only son of Mr Thomas Deeman, formerly of Coleshill, and brother of Mrs H. Bryan and Miss A. Deeman, Parkfield Road, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 08:35:08

Name: William Henry Dooley
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 2nd Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps
Rank: Rifleman
Date Of Death: 29/4/1918

Name: Harold Arthur Drakeford
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: 8th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry
Rank: 2nd Lieutenant
Date Of Death: 5/4/1918
Notes: Harold Arthur Drakeford was born in Coleshill in March 1892. The son of Charles, an auctioneer's clerk, and Mary Ann, Second Lieutenant Drakeford lived at 66 High Street and worked as a ‘order clerk merchants office’. He joined the 2nd Birmingham Battalion (15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment) and was later gazetted into the 8th battalion, Somerset Light Infantry. He was killed in action on 5 April 1918, and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:07:04
Notes: It is with regret we have to record the death of Second-Lieutenant H. A. Drakeford, 8th Somerset Light Infantry, who was killed in action in France on April 5th, He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Drakeford, of High Street, Coleshill, who had their four sons with the Forces. Harold Drakeford, who was 26 years of age, joined the 2nd Birmingham City Battalion in August 1914, and went with his regiment to France in November, 1915. After nineteen months active service he came back in April last year for a course of training as an officer, and as a cadet was stationed at Whittington Barracks. He was able to get home frequently during this period. In December last he was gazetted to the 8th Somerset Light Infantry, and went out on December 27th. The official intimation of his death reached the parents in Friday last, and a letter since received from the Lieutenant-Colonel commanding stated: " He was a most excellent and conscientious officer, and was leading his platoon most gallantly at the time he was killed. He had not been with us very long, but everyone was fond of him." Mrs. Drakeford received a letter a few days ago which was written in the day previous to his death. In it he wrote:" The weather has turned out rotten lately, and it is raining today, which makes things very unpleasant. I can assure you I am tired of wallowing in sloppy mud and it makes everything very miserable. I have managed to stick it so far, and will try and carry on as best as I can, but it requires a lot of grit these days, I can assure you. . . . Please do not worry, for we are all in his hands and cannot be better looked after. We must trust in the same Providence that has so far proved our mainstay in the past. If it is His will that we are to meet again on this earth, well me must bow to it, and must simply live until "On the resurrection morning Father, mother, sister, brother, Meet once more.' It is a hard time for all during this final push of Fritz, but surely if there is a God, as we firmly believe there is, we cannot have any fears as to the future. . . . Rest assured everything that happens is His own plan, and there can be no better." Lieut. Drakeford was engaged, and would have come over on leave shortly to be married. The banns would have been published in Sunday last. At Coleshill Parish Church on Sunday the Vicar referred to the sad loss of Lieut. Drakeford, who took an active role in the C.E.M.S. and Sunday School, besides being a member of the choir. He was secretary to the Coleshill Cricket Club for several seasons, and was wicket keeper in the team, filling the position with much ability, besides being an excellent batsman. His death will be keenly felt by many friends, and much sympathy is expressed for the bereaved parents in their loss. Coleshill Chronicle April 20th, 1918
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-17 13:45:35
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 28th April 1917 COLESHILL CRICKET CLUB GENERAL MEETING OF MEMBERS A general meeting of Coleshill Cricket Club was held on April 24th, Mr F.W.D. Pinney J.P. presiding. Mr Harold Drakeford, the hon. secretary, having just returned from the front with a view of obtaining his commission, was heartily welcomed at the meeting.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 17:17:53
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 17th November 1917 SECOND LIEUTENANT DRAKEFORD Cadet H. A. Drakeford has been gazetted second lieutenant, and attached to a Devonshire Regiment. He is at present on home leave, but will be leaving early next week to join at the regiment’s headquarters. Lieutenant Drakeford is a son of Mr and Mrs Charles Drakeford, of High Street, Coleshill. He joined a Birmingham City Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and has seen considerable active service on the Western front. He came home in May last to train for his commission.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 18:42:23
Notes: Second Lieutenant Drakeford is also remembered on the Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:01:58

Name: John Faulkner
Year Of Birth: 1891
Unit: 14th (Service) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 6/9/1916
Notes: John Faulkner was born on the 3rd November 1891 in Dudley to parents Rowland and Isabella Faulkner. In 1901 the family were living at 19 Tibbets Garden, Rowley Regis and Rowland was working as a chain maker. John had a younger sister Sarah (born 1894) and two younger brothers, Job Randalf (born 1895) and Arthur Rowland (born 1897). In late 1901 their father Rowland died, and in 1905 their mother Isabella (nee Gilner) also died. This left John and his three siblings in the care of the Dudley Union Workhouse. On the 12th February 1906, at the request of the Priest from Dudley, John was transferred to the St Vincent’s Home for Working Boys on Moseley Road in Birmingham. Sarah was sent to The St Joseph’s Home for Girls, and Job and Arthur were both sent to the St Paul’s Home for Boys in Coleshill. Whilst at St Vincent’s John was employed by Messrs Hoods Ltd, Wholesale Warehousemen, on Church Street, Birmingham, as a warehouse boy. He was discharged from St Vincent’s to lodgings on the 6th June 1908. On the 21st April 1910 John’s brothers were emigrated to Canada aboard the steam ship ‘Corsican’. In 1911 John was boarding with the Lawrie family at 60 Moseley Road, Birmingham, and working as a screw cutter. His sister Sarah got married in 1912 to John W Homer at Dudley, and they later lived at 51 Beehive Street, Cradley Heath. Following the outbreak of war, John Faulkner enlisted in the 14th (Service) Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment at Birmingham. The Battalion was formed at Bristol as a Bantam Battalion in April 1915, and by August of that year they were at Salisbury Plain. The 14th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment first served in France on the 30th January 1916. Sometime during 1916 Private John Faulkner (service number 21950)was wounded in action and transferred back to the UK. He was treated in the Princess Christian’s Military Hospital at Englefield Green, Egham, Surrey. The hospital was a temporary arrangement of huts on Englefield Green. On the 6th September 1916 Private Faulkner died from the effects of a gun shot wound to the head and a cerebral absess, aged 25. He is buried in Englefield Green Cemetery, Plot 10, Grave 770 and is also remembered on the memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill. Private Faulkner was posthumously awarded the British War and Allied Victory medals. His sister Sarah also applied for his 1914-15 Star Medal.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-10-25 14:25:22

Name: William Firkin
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 5th Canadian Mounted Rifle Battalion (Quebec Regiment)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 2/10/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. William Firkin was born on the 16th August 1896 in Birmingham, son of William and Emily Firkin. He grew up in the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, and was sent to Canada as part of a program of emigration, in 1910. He sailed aboard the Corsica on 19th May 1910 and landed at Quebec, where he went on to work as a farmer. William Firkin enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force on 2nd February 1915. Private Firkin served with the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion Quebec Regiment (service number 110160) and died in France on 2nd October 1916, aged 19 years. He is remembered on the Vimy Memorial, France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-26 14:48:41
Notes: I have recently discovered that William Firkin is my Great Uncle. My Grandad,Joseph Firkin was William Firkin's Brother.
Notes added by: Bernard Firkin on 2017-06-28 23:47:53

Name: Joseph Fitzgerald
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 1st Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 8/2/1915
Notes: Joseph Fitzgerald was born in 1885 in Birmingham to parents Bartholomew and Pauline Fitzgerald. The family lived in Ladywood, Birmingham. Joseph’s father died in 1894 and the family fell on hard times. Pauline was sent to the workhouse several times and so Joseph was sent to the St Paul’s Home for Boys, Coleshill, and then the St Vincent’s Home, Moseley Road, Birmingham. He left in June 1899 and was sent to live in Ramsgate. At some point after this he returned to Birmingham and enlisted in the Army, and served abroad with the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service number 9259). Private Fitzgerald was awarded the Indian General Service Medal 1908 with two bars. In 1911 he was serving in Ceylon & India. At the outbreak of WW1 the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment were at Shorncliffe, Kent, forming part of the 10th Brigade, 4th Division. They were quickly mobilised and landed in France on 22nd August 1914, after initially being held back to defend England against a possible German invasion. The Battalion provided reinforcements at the Battle of Le Cateau and saw action at the Battle of the Marne, the Battle of the Aisne and the Battle of Messines. They also took part in the Christmas Truce of 1914. At the beginning of February 1915 the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment were away from the frontline trenches for a few days, and billeted near Steenwerk in northern France, close to the border with Belgium. On the 8th February a group of men left their billets to have a look around and buy some food locally. They were returning to their billets along the railway in the evening when a light engine came and accidentally killed two of the men: Private Allen Yapp and Private Joseph Fitzgerald. Both men were buried the next day in La Creche Communal Cemetery. Private Fitzgerald was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals. He is also remembered on the War Memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-01-15 20:46:54
Notes: Birmingham Daily Mail 1st March 1915 LOCAL VICTIMS BIRMINGHAM SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION News has been received by Mr H.W. Beck, superintendent of St Vincent’s Home, Moseley Road, that Private Joseph Fitzgerald, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on the 8th of February. Fitzgerald was an old boy of St Vincent’s.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-01-15 20:47:43

Name: John Fletcher Fox
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: Royal Warwickshire Regiment and 1st Royal Berkshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 10/3/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial, John Fletcher Fox was born in 1897 in Atherstone and christened on the 13th October 1897. His parents were Fletcher John and Harriet Minnie Fox, of The Griffin, Shustoke. John attended The Coleshill Grammar School and later enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Warwick (service number 18959). He was transferred to the 1st Battalion Prince Charlotte of Wales’s (Royal Berkshire) Regiment (service number 33031). Private Fox was killed in action on 10th March 1917, aged 19, and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He was awarded the Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 21:02:48
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 8th March 1918 DEATHS – IN MEMORIAM FOX – In loving memory of John Fletcher Fox (Jack), who was killed in action on March 10th, 1917, aged 19. Death divides, but memory clings.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 21:03:19
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 12th March 1921 DEATHS – IN MEMORIAM FOX – In loving memory of John Fletcher Fox (Jack), who was killed in action on March 10th, 1917, aged 19. Never forgotten.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 21:03:52
Notes: Private Fox is also remembered on the Shustoke War Memorial.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 21:04:28

Name: Albert Gallagher
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Drummer
Date Of Death: 31/10/1914
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Albert Gallagher was born in Middleborough, Yorkshire, in 1887. By 1901 he was living at the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, and was a half time Tailor. He enlisted in the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Warwick, and was living at the Whittington Barracks, near Lichfield, in 1911, where he is recorded as a Private with the same regiment. Private Gallagher (service number 414) was assigned to the Battalion's Drum Corps as a Drummer. The 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment landed in Western Europe on 6th October 1914. Just a few weeks later Drummer Gallagher died of wounds received on 31st October 1914, and is remembered on the Ypres Town Cemetery Extension, Belgium. He was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 22:12:06

Name: William Gallagher
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 2nd Battalion King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 11/10/1914
Notes: Commemorated on the Memorial in the Catholic Church, William Gallagher was born in Bradford, Yorkshire. He grew up at the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, and in 1905 moved to the St Vincent’s Home for Working Boys on Moseley Road in Birmingham. William was a Regular Soldier, having enlisted before the outbreak of war. He enlisted in Halifax with the 2nd Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (service number 10837). His Battalion were part of the 13th Brigade, 5th Division, who landed at Le Havre on the 16th August 1914, and were involved in the Battle of Mons and subsequent retreat. Private Gallagher was killed in action on the 11th October 1914 at Richebourg, and is remembered on the Le Touret Memorial in France. He was awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-08-23 14:55:40
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 19, Summer 1915 (second war edition). “William Gallagher, another old St Paul’s boy, came to St Vincent’s in 1905. He was killed in action at Richebourg October 11th 1914.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-08-23 14:56:12

Name: Cecil Campbell Gibbons
Year Of Birth: 1899
Unit: A Coy, 5th Battalion, Dorsetshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 10/3/1918

Name: Leonard Joseph Green
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 1st/6th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 29/5/1915
Notes: Born in Coleshill in 1895. Lived on Coleshill High Street and was employed as a railway clerk.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-05 16:36:40
Notes: Leonard Joseph Green was born in Coleshill in April 1895. The son of Julianna Alma Green, a widow, he lived on Coleshill High Street and was employed as a railway clerk in 1911. Private Green was enlisted into 1st/6th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 2630, and was killed in action on 29 May 1915. He is buried at Berks Cemetery, Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:07:35
Notes: Leonard was Baptised at Coleshill Church on 4 May 1895, to parents William, a Builder (he is recorded in 1891 Census as a Carpenter & Builder), and Julianna Green of High Street. Three siblings were also Baptised there; Walter William (1888), Florence Annie (1891) and Percy Albert (1893). His Father William was born in Worcestershire and died 1899 and was buried at Coleshill Church, 29 May 1899. His Mother was born in Sedgley, Staffordshire and died 1938, burial unknown.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-22 12:33:45
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 5th June 1915 COLESHILL ROLL OF HONOUR It is with great regret that we record the death of Private Leonard Joseph Green, who was killed in France, on Saturday night last. He is the youngest son of Mrs Green, Ferndale, Coleshill, and enlisted in the 1st/6th Royal Warwicks soon after the outbreak of the war. He has been in the trenches for about ten weeks. Prior to the outbreak of war he was on the staff at Lloyds Bank, Colmore Row, Birmingham. He spent his twentieth birthday in the trenches.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 09:13:57
Notes: Private Green is also remembered on the Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:03:03
Notes: Birmingham Daily Post 5th June 1915 LOCAL CASUALTIES Relatives have been notified that the following Birmingham men have been killed in action: Private Leonard Joseph Green, 1st 6th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the son of the late Mr William Green and Mrs Julianna Alma Green, of Ferndale, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-05-04 21:03:42

Name: Ralph Patrick Gwynne
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 9th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 14/9/1918
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Ralph Patrick Gwynne was born in India in 1895. He grew up at the St Pauls Home, Coleshill, and the Catholic Working Boys Home, in Aston, Warwickshire. In 1911 he was recorded in Aston as a Brass worker. Ralph Gwynne joined the 9th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment, which was formed at Worcester in August 1914. Private Gwynne (service number 13608) was killed in action on the 14th September 1918 in Mesopotamia. He is remembered on the Tehran Memorial, Iran. He received the 1914-15 Star, British and Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-03 15:00:00

Name: William John Henry Gwynne
Year Of Birth: 1891
Unit: 1st Royal Munster Fusiliers
Rank: Lance-Corporal
Date Of Death: 26/4/1915
Notes: William John Henry Gwynne was born in Rawalpindi, India, in 1890, to parents William and Alice Gwynne. Sometime after the birth of his younger brother Ralph in 1894, the family returned to England, settling in Wichenford, Worcestershire. In 1899 William and Ralph were sent to live in the St Paul’s Home for Boys, Coleshill. In 1904 William moved to the St Vincent’s Home on Moseley Road, Birmingham. At the age of 15 he was living there whilst working as a Trolley Boy for the Midland Railway Company. On the 30th November 1907 William was discharged from St Vincent’s into lodgings. In 1909 William Gwynne enlisted at Birmingham in the 1st Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers, service number 9236. In 1911 he was serving abroad with his Regiment in India. Upon the outbreak of war the 1st Royal Munster Fusiliers were serving in Rangoon, Burma. They returned to the UK in January 1915 and were stationed at Coventry, under the 86th Brigade, 29th Division. On the 16th March 1915 they sailed for Gallipoli from Avonmouth, travelling via Alexandria and Mudros. Lance Corporal Gwynne landed with his Regiment at Cape Helles on the 25th April 1915. He was killed in action the following day, aged 24 years. Lance Corporal Gwynne is buried in Plot 55, Row A, of the V Beach Cemetery, Turkey. He was posthumously awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals. Lance Corporal Gwynne appears on the Roll of Honour of the Old Boys who fell in the Great War in the St Vincent’s Journal, No. 31, January 1919, but is missing from the Memorial in St Teresa’s and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-02-08 18:05:09
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 19, Summer 1915. William Gwynne came to St Paul’s in 1899, and was received into St Vincent’s in 1904. He joined the Army in 1909, and was killed in the Dardanelles last June. His brother Ralph is serving in the Worcesters. Lance-Corporal Gwynne – We all felt very keenly the death of Lance-Corporal Gwynne. His regiment, after its return from India, was stationed for a short time at Coventry, before going to the Dardanelles, so we saw quite a lot of him. He was so cheerful and hopeful. God has seen fit to take him. May he rest in peace. This was about the last card he wrote to us before going into action:- “I now have the pleasure of writing you these few lines, hoping that you and Rev. Father Wall and all in the Homes are in the best of health, as it leaves me at present. Dear Rev. Father, we are having a fine life so far; we are camping out just against the sea, and we have a parade from 9 a.m. to about 12.30, and then we have a bathing parade about 3.30 p.m. or 4 p.m., and then we are finished for the day, unless we are on a night march, and then we parade about 6.30 p.m. or 7 p.m. and then we finish about 8 p.m. to 8.30 p.m. Dear Rev. Father, it is a bit hot out here, and we have to wear out helmets so that we will not get the sunstroke, as it is nearly as hot out here as it is in India. Dear Rev. Father, I would like to get Jimmy Carroll’s address, as I should like to write to him so as to let each of us know how we are getting on. I would like you to remember me to all in the Homes and also Mr and Mrs Beck. Excuse postcard as I am short of writing paper and envelopes. Give my best wishes to all at home, hoping to see you when I come home again. May Almighty God spare us to meet again.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-02-08 18:06:04
Notes: Birmingham Daily Post 8th June 1915 LOCAL ROLL OF HONOUR Notification has been received by the relatives that the following Birmingham men have been killed in action:- Lance-corporal W. Gwynne, 1st Battalion Royal Munster Fusiliers, an old St Vincent Homes Boy.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-02-09 20:13:52

Name: George Hastings
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 11th Battalion, Prince of Wales’ Own West Yorkshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 7/10/1916
Notes: Born in Coleshill, Private Hastings (service number 15823) enlisted in Birmingham in the 11th battalion, Prince of Wales’ Own West Yorkshire Regiment . He was killed in action on 7 October 1916 and is commemorated on Thiepval Memorial.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:08:14
Notes: George Hastings was related as a 2nd Cousin to William Abraham Hastings also recorded upon this monument. George was also related to William Smith (also on this memorial), who was his first cousin.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-24 23:15:26
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 4th November 1916 DEATHS HASTINGS – Killed in action, in France, on the 7th October, Private G. Hastings, West Yorks Regiment, youngest son of Mr G Hastings, Packington Lane, Coleshill, aged 18 years.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 17:06:02
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 18th November 1916 DEATHS HASTINGS – In loving memory of Private George Hastings, 15823, of the West Yorks Regiment, who was killed in action 7th October, 1916. Farewell, beloved, sleep on and take thy rest. I loved thee well, but Jesus loved thee best, Until we both shall meet again, in that eternal rest, farewell! - Ever remembered by his fiancée, Elsie.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 17:13:19

Name: William Abraham Hastings
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: Royal Garrison Artillery (Attch 1/2 Lancashire Regt Heavy Battery)
Rank: Gunner/Driver
Date Of Death: 4/4/1918
Notes: Service number: 61337. William Abraham Hastings was born in Coleshill and is recorded in the Coleshill Chronicle as having enlisted in August 1915. A gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery he was killed in action on 4 April 1918 and is buried in Daours cemetary. Mr. and Mrs. Hastings, of Coventry Road, Coleshill, have recieved intimation that their son, William was killed in France on April 4th. The deceased was 26 years of age, and joined the R.G.A. in 1915. Prior to this he worked on the Midland Railway. The following letter has been recieved by the parents - Extract from Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, May 4, 1918 Dear Mrs. Hastings, - No doubt you will have heard officially the sad news of your son's death in action. I am writing to tell you how much the officers and men of the battery regret his loss, and to give you our sympathy. I have, I believe, served with him ever since he came to France, both in the 118th Heavy Batty, and in this battery. He was a most excellent driver, and a very good soldier, and we regrer his loss immensely. I was present when he was killed, and it will be some consolation to you to know that he died without feeling the least pain. A splinter from a shell struck him on the head as he was lying on a bank, and death was quite instantaneous. I am not sure that he was not asleep at the time. This was about 1 p.m. on April 4th, when his battery was being heavily shelled. He invariably behaved with great coolness under fire. He was buried at the military cemetery at Daours by the Brigade Chaplain in the presence of his many comrades.- Yours sincerly, H.E. POPE, CAPT. 1/2 Lancs, Heavy Batty., B.E.F. April 21st, 1918
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:08:59
Notes: He was Baptised at Coleshill 23 Apr 1892 to parents John & Louisa.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-24 00:32:37
Notes: His Mother was Louisa Widdowson, born at Brownhills. The Coleshill Parish Marriage record has her Father entered as Edwin, however, all other records point to her being a Daughter of Abraham Widdowson & Mary Ann Sharrard who married at Coleshill 27 Jan 1862. William was related as a 2nd Cousin to George Hastings also recorded upon this monument.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-24 14:59:54
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 18th November 1916 WOUNDED IN THE WAR Mrs Hastings, of Packington Lane, Coleshill, has received a letter from an officer in the Worcester Regiment, to which her son Charles belongs. The following is an extract from the letter, which Mrs Hastings received to inform her that her son was wounded in Salonika:- “it is with great regret that I write to inform you that your son, Pte Charles Hastings, was wounded in action on October 12th. He was working on the flank of the company as a bomber when he received his wound, a fracture in the lower end of his left thigh. Although not a N.C.O. he was one of those who naturally influence all around him. I myself shall miss his cheery remarks and continual keenness when at work. All the platoon wish their comrade a speedy recovery. – A. E. GIBBS, Lieut., Wor. R.” Mrs Hastings has three sons in all the forces: Joe Hastings, who is also in hospital in England, wounded; and William Hastings, who is still ‘somewhere’ in France. The wounded soldier is not connected with the Hastings of last week’s letter, although he is wounded in a similar manner.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-26 16:34:10

Name: Frederick Holtom
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 1st Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Sergeant
Date Of Death: 9/4/1917
Notes: Frederick Holtom was born in Hampton Lucy, Warwickshire, in 1889. He was the eldest son of Joseph and Martha Jane Holtom, and he had eight siblings. Frederick started his career as a Bottler at Messrs Kenway Ltd, Moor St., Birmingham. He joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment on the 22nd November 1904 at Warwick, giving his age as 17. Fred is recorded on the 1911 census as a Private with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Ceylon and India. His regiment landed in France on 22nd August 1914. Acting Sergeant Frederick Holtom was killed in action in France on 9th April 1917. He received the Victory, British and 1914 Star medals and is remembered in the Ste. Catherine British Cemetery, Arras, Pas de Calais, France. Although Frederick never lived in Coleshill, his parents and some of his siblings lived here at the time of his death, and both his parents are buried at Coleshill Parish Church. His brother-in-law, Sidney Stilgoe, also served during WW1, and is recorded on the list of Old Boys of the Coleshill Church School who joined up during the Great War, which is displayed in the Market Hall, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-02-16 20:54:25
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 26th May 1917 DEATHS HOLTOM – In loving memory of our dear son, Sergeant F. Holtom, who died from wounds received in action April 9th, 1917. Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear. Deeply mourned by all.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 08:28:11
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 13th April 1918 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM HOLTOM – In proud and loving memory of our dear brother, Sergeant Fred Holtom (Royal Warwicks), who died of wounds received in action, April 9th, 1917. When the roll is called up yonder, And our saviour counts the brave, Our brother will be amongst them, For his precious life he gave. No loved one stood beside him, To hear his last farewell, No words of comfort could he have From those who loved him well. - Sister and brother-in-law, Mr and Mrs F. S. Stillgoe, Whitacre.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 08:21:52

Name: Henry Holtom
Year Of Birth: 1888
Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 8/11/1918
Notes: Born in Hampton Lucy. Born in 1888 he was 30 years old at the time of his death. residence on 1901 census puts him in Cottage Lane, Nether Whitacre, son of a Railway worker. 1911 puts him in Ladywood, Birmingham having just got married and working as a Printers Machinist.’ Private H Holtom (service number 2003), a member of 2nd battalions Royal Warwickshire Regiment died on 8 November 1918. He is buried at Cremona Town Cemetery in Italy.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:10:29
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 15th November 1919 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM HOLTOM – In loving memory of our dear son, Henry Holtom, 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died November 8th, 1918, of Influenza, in Italy. Youngest son of Mr and Mrs Holtom. Never forgotten by Father, Mother and Sisters. Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-17 14:04:38

Name: Sidney William Johnson
Year Of Birth: 1891
Unit: 3rd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 16/6/1917
Notes: Sidney William Johnson was born in Coleshill in July 1891. The son of Mary Ryder and stepson to Joseph Ryder, a farm labourer, Private Johnson himself worked as a general labourer for the County Council and resided on ‘Taberners Row’, Coventry Road, Coleshill. Enlisted into the 3rd batallion, Worcestershire Regiment, Private Johnson, service number 16825, died on 16 June 1917. He is buried at St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetary in Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:12:26
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 18th June 1921 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM JOHNSON – In ever loving memory of Private S W Johnson, 11th Worcester Regiment, killed in action in France, June 16th 1917.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-17 14:23:11
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 14th July 1917 KILLED IN THE WAR The list of casualties published on Friday contained the name of Private S W Johnson, of Coleshill, who enlisted in the Worcestershire Regiment.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-05-30 09:48:52

Name: Joseph Keatley
Year Of Birth: 1890
Unit: 10th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 30/10/1918
Notes: Joseph Keatley was born in Coleshill in 1890. He lived with his parents, William and Ann, on the Coventry Road. Like his father Private Keatley was a farm labourer. He joined the 10th battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s Own) and died on 30 October 1918 at Kassel, Hessen, Germany. Private Keatley, service number 15734, is buried at Niederzwehren Cemetery, Germany.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:13:05

Name: John Kelly DCM
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 1/6th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment
Rank: Sergeant
Date Of Death: 30/12/1917

Name: James Kilkenny
Year Of Birth: 1886
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 24/8/1915
Notes: James Kilkenny was born in Birmingham on the 9th May 1886. His father, also called James, worked as a Bricklayer. By 1901 James was living at the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, Warwickshire, having previously been under the care of the Birmingham Board of Guardians. It is not clear what happened to his parents. At the age of 14 James was as a half-time student at St Paul’s and also working as a shoemaker. Upon leaving Coleshill James enlisted in the Army, probably the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, completing his training by 1906. After leaving the Army he worked for a short time for the London and North Western Railway (probably in the Midlands) as a labourer. On Christmas Day 1909 James married Louisa (Lucy) Liddiard at St Asaph’s Church, Birmingham. Their first child Annie Elizabeth was born in 1910. The family were living with Louisa’s mother at Bow Street, Birmingham, in 1911 and James was working as a stoker in a factory. They had two more children, Catherine in 1911 (died the same year) and Lucy who was born in 1913. At this time James was working for the Midland Rubber Company. Upon the outbreak of war, as a Reservist, Private Kilkenny (service number 9459) would have been immediately re-called to the Army and was posted to the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Shorncliffe, Kent, forming part of the 10th Brigade, 4th Division. They were quickly mobilised and sailed for France on 22nd August 1914, after initially being held back to defend England against a possible German invasion. The Regiment arrived at Boulogne the following day and travelled by train and then route march to Aucourt, arriving there on 26th August, when they encountered their first action of the war. Private Kilkenny was wounded in the retreat from Mons and by mid-September 1914 he had returned to the Midlands and been admitted to the 1st Southern General Hospital (Bournbrook), Birmingham. He returned to France in June 1915 and joined the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Private Kilkenny was killed in action on the 24th August 1915 and is buried in Plot II, Row A, Grave 30 at Le Touret Military Cemetery, Richebourg-l’Avoue, France. He was posthumously awarded the 1914 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals. For serving under fire he was also awarded the Clasp to the 1914 Star Medal. Private Kilkenny is also remembered on the War Memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill, and in the WW1 Roll of Honour in the Hall of Memory, Birmingham.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-03 14:41:03
Notes: Coventry Evening Telegraph 18th September 1914 Royal Warwickshire Casualties The following casualties are notified: Royal Warwickshire Regiment – wounded, admitted 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham, Private J. Kilkenny, 9459.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-16 09:09:05
Notes: Birmingham Daily Mail 6th September 1915 LOCAL ROLL OF HONOUR Notification has been received by relatives of the deaths of:- Private James Kilkenny, of the 2nd Royal Warwicks. His widow and two children live at 32, Bow Street, Birmingham, and before he joined the army Private Kilkenny was employed by the Midland Rubber Company. He was wounded in the retreat from Mons, and was for a time at the Bournbrook Hospital, returning to France in June.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-16 09:09:44
Notes: Birmingham Daily Mail 24th August 1917 KILKENNY – In loving memory of James Kilkenny, R.W.R., killed in action Aug 24, 1914. Not forgotten by his wife, children, mother-in-law.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-16 09:10:38

Name: William Charles Kimberlee
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: C Battery, 69th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery
Rank: Gunner/Driver
Date Of Death: 27/7/1917
Notes: William Charles Kimberlee was born in September 1897 in Curdworth to Joseph and Elizabeth. In 1911 he was living with his family in Cole End. His father was a carpenter he was a paper boy. Driver Kimberlee, service number 11214, enlisted in the ‘C’ battery, 69th brigade, Royal Field Artillery. He died on 27 July 1917 in Mesopotamia and is commemorated on the Basra Memorial.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:13:36
Notes: A Coleshill Soldier Drowned Mrs. T. Kimberlee, of Coleshill, has received the following letter from the commanding officer of the battery (R.F.A.) in which her son was a driver, and which is serving in Messopotamia:- C/69, R.F.A., 14th Division, Messopotamia Expeditionary Force, July 27th 1917. Mrs T. Kimberlee, Coleshill, Dear Madam,- I regret to have to inform you of the death of your son, Driver Kimberlee, in this unit, this morning, by drowning. He, with the rest of the battery, was swimming across the Diala river, near which we are in camp. While in mid-stream his horse gave a little trouble, so he left it, and was swimming after it to the bank. Suddenly, for no apparent reason, he was seen to sink, and was carried away at once by the rather swift current. The river is only about 80 yards broad at this point. He may have been struck by the horse (not probable, according to witnesses), or attacked by sudden cramp, or heart failure, but he disappeared at once. His loss in the battery is greatly felt, as he was a very steady, hard working, and reliable man, always cheerful and contented, and a very good example to all-in fact , a model artillery driver. I wish all were like him. I will see that any of his small effects are despatched to you. Kindly communicate with me if any further details are required. B.G. Ward, Major, Commanding C/69, R.F.A. Coleshill Chronicle
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-17 13:42:47
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 18th August 1917 COLESHILL SOLDIER ACCIDENTALLY DROWNED We regret to record the death of Private Wm. Charles Kimberlee, serving with the Indian Expeditionary Forces in Mesopotamia, who was accidentally drowned on July 27th. He was a son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Kimberlee, of Cole End, Coleshill. Private Kimberlee enlisted in September 1914, in his 18th year, and has seen considerable service. Prior to the war, he was employed at Mr H Field’s Nursery, Coventry Road, Coleshill, and was a very devoted member of the Coleshill Brass Band.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 08:53:24

Name: Herbert Ronald King
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 25th Battalion, Canadian Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 9/8/1918
Notes: Herbert Ronald King was born on 24 February 1898 in Lapworth. The son of Herbert William King and Alice, Private King moved to Bridgetown, Nova Scotia in 1912 before joining the 25th battalion, Canadian Infantry, service number 901291. He was killed on 9 August 1918 and is buried at Rosieres Communal Cemetery.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:04:00

Name: Thomas George King
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 31/7/1917
Notes: Private Thomas George King, service number 16998, was a recruit of the 1st battalion Coldstream Guards, and died on 31 July 1917. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate, Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:15:44
Notes: Private George King Killed In Action. It is with regret that we learn of the sad news which Mrs. George King, of Coventry Road, Coleshill, received from the War Office, stating that Private George King of the Coldstream Guards, was killed in action on the 31st of July. He was serving with his regiment in France, where he had been for the last year, having been in training and elsewhere previously, thus making in all two years services with the forces. The letters received from Private King while in France were typical of the brave and high-spirited men who are so cheerfully and nobly defending their homes and liberty. His last words, before leaving home were that he was going with a good heart and should remain so. Private King was a printer's machineman before enlisting, he learnt his trade with Mr. D. Whitehead, High Street, Coleshill. Coleshill Chronicle. Saturday, August 18th, 1917
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-19 14:02:00

Name: Thomas King
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 30/8/1918

Name: Thomas Knight
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 12/2/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Thomas Knight was born on 7th August 1897 in Dewsbury, Yorkshire, and christened on 1st September 1897 at Daw Green. His parents were John and Mary Knight. Thomas Knight is connected with the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, and the St Vincent’s Home, Birmingham. Thomas Knight enlisted in the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment at the outbreak of the Great War, when he was just 16 years old. When his real age was discovered he was sent to do munitions work, but later joined his Regiment on active service. Private Knight (service number 11281) was killed in action in Mesopotamia on 12th February 1917 and is remembered in the Amara War Cemetery, Iraq. He was awarded the Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-29 17:16:38
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 22, Spring 1916 One of our boys, Tommy Knight, was doing some useful work with a machine gun, when he was sent home through his correct age having been discovered. It is wonderful how keen some of these youngsters are. St Vincent’s Journal No. 23, Summer 1916 Thomas Knight called at St Vincent’s during the past quarter. St Vincent’s Journal No.26, Spring 1917. T Knight was killed in action in the Mesopotamia fighting on the 12th February, 1917. At the outbreak of the war he enlisted, being then but sixteen years old. After some months he was recalled to do munition work, but soon left to join his regiment at his own request. He was 18 last August.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-29 17:17:39

Name: Francis Knott
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 14th Battalion Canadian Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 17/8/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Francis Knott was born on 23rd February 1898 in Middlesex, London. He appears on the 1911 census living at the St Edwards Home for Boys, Coleshill. He joined the Canadian Infantry, Quebec Regiment, 14th Battalion, service number 847141. Private Knott was killed in action on 17th August 1917 in France, aged just 19 years. He is remembered on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-03 14:55:31

Name: Sidney Rowland Lea
Year Of Birth: 1889
Unit: 19th Battalion, Welch Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 31/10/1918
Notes: Sidney Rowland Lea was born in January 1889 in Coleshill. The son of Charles and Ann , he lived in Cole End and worked as a farm labourer. He was enlisted at Walsall into 19th battalion Welsh Regiment and died on 31 October 1918 of his wounds. He is buried at Forest Communal Cemetery in France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:16:39
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 14th December 1918 DEATHS LEA – Private Sidney Rowland, aged 29, youngest son of Charles Lea, Lower High Street, Coleshill, killed in action October 31st, 1918.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 09:00:11

Name: Frank Joseph Lycett
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: Royal Canadian Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 7/3/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church, Frank (Francis) Joseph Lycett was born on 11th June 1896 in Walsall. His parents were Frederick (a puddler, making wrought iron) and Bridget Lycett. Frank went to live in the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, in 1910, and was sent as part of their emigration programme to Canada to work as a farmer in 1911. Frank Lycett enlisted in the Royal Canadian Regiment on 19th January 1915 (service number 402564). Private Lycett was killed in action on 7th March 1916 aged 19 years. He is remembered in the Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery, Belgium.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-03 15:15:54
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 22, Spring 1916 Frank Lycett came to St Paul’s from Walsall in August 1910. There he was always bright and genial, ever ready to give a helping hand. He was one of the most enthusiastic workers in levelling the present football field. He went to Canada on May 18th, 1911. After doing exceedingly well he joined the Canadian Contingent at the outbreak of war. He was killed in action on March 7th.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-03 15:16:30
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 21, 1915. Denis Griffin, Frank Lycett and Frank Mancini, who have crossed the seas, visited the Homes. It was a treat to see them again. They thought Canada fine, and had got on so well there that they have no intention of staying in this country after Germany’s punishment.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-22 19:10:29

Name: John Frederick Lycett
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: Royal Canadian Regiment
Rank: Corporal
Date Of Death: 26/8/1918
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church, John Frederick Lycett was born on 4th September 1895 in Walsall, Staffordshire. He was the eldest son of Frederick and Bridget Lycett, and brother of Frank (Francis) Lycett, who is also remembered at St Teresa’s, Coleshill. Bridget died in 1909 and her sons were sent to St Pauls’ Home, Coleshill. Frederick appears on the 1911 census as a school pupil, residing at St Paul’s. Like his brother, Frederick was sent to Canada as part of the emigration program where he worked as a labourer in Ontario.\r\nFrederick Lycett enlisted with the Royal Canadian Regiment overseas Expeditionary Force on 21st August 1915 (service number 477553). Corporal Lycett was killed in action in Monchy, France, on 26th August 1918, and is remembered on the Vimy Memorial, France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-22 20:38:03

Name: Maurice Maher
Year Of Birth: 1894
Unit: HMS Invincible
Rank: Musician
Date Of Death: 31/5/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Maurice Emmett was born on 11th December 1894 in Colne, Lancashire. His parents were John Emmett and Mary Maher, and he served under his mother’s maiden name. Musician Maurice Maher is recorded on the 1911 census (service number RMB/1509), aged 16, aboard HMS Lord Nelson, a First Class Battleship. This ship was part of the Home Fleet on the night of the census, and was located in the North Sea off Newcastle. Musician Maher of the Royal Marine Band was killed in action aboard the HMS Invincible on the 31st May 1916, the first day of the Battle of Jutland. The ship, a Battle Cruiser, was blown up and sunk in the North Sea with the loss of over 1000 lives. Musician Maher was awarded the Star, Victory and British medals and is remembered on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, England.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 08:45:14

Name: Edwin Walter Mallin
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 3rd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 21/3/1917
Notes: Edwin Walter Mallin was the son of Edwin G. and Lizzie Mallin. Born in Gravelley Hill in 1898, he lived with his parents in Northfield before moving to Coleshill. Private Mallin,service number 21968, was enlisted at Birmingham into 3rd battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He died on the Isle of Wight on 21 March 1917 and is buried in Coleshill Cemetery.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:17:32
Notes: Possible that initials on Coleshill War Memorial are incorrect...Shown as F W rather than E W.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 23:36:19
Notes: Service Serial No: 21968 CWGC Record at: - http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2751091/MALLIN,%20E%20W Find A Grave Memorial# 74106278 at: - http://www.findagrave.com/
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-22 14:31:16
Notes: Baptised at Aston, St Peter and St Paul 20 Feb 1898 to Edwin George & Lizzie Howard recorded as of 14 Woodland Road, Gravelly Hill. Fathers Occupation recorded as a Traveller.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-22 14:46:19

Name: Edwin George Mallin
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 12th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/9/1915
Notes: Edwin George Mallin was born in 1871 in Birmingham. In 1897 he married Lizzie Howard Adams of Coleshill and their first child, also called Edwin, was born in 1898. By 1901 the family were living at 76 Ascot Road, Northfield, Birmingham, and Edwin was working as a labourer. Lizzie was admitted to the Central Hospital of the Warwick Country Lunatic Asylum in 1907, where she remained for several years. By 1911 Edwin and his son were boarding with the Bicknell family on Coventry Road in Coleshill. Edwin senior was working as a farm labourer and Edwin junior attended the Parochial School.\r\n\r\nFollowing the outbreak of war Edwin George Mallin enlisted in Birmingham into the 12th (Service) Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’ Own), service number 13250. Private Mallin would have been about 44 years old at the time of enlistment, and it is thought that he gave his age as ten years younger in order to sign up. The 12th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment were formed in September 1914 as part of K3 and were under the orders of the 63rd Brigade, 21st Division. Private Mallin landed with his Battalion at Boulogne on the 11th September 1915. They travelled by train and route march to Noeux-les-Mires, arriving on the 25th September. The following day they relieved the Northamptons and the Battalion saw their first action of the war the next day. It was in this action on the 27th September 1915 that Private Mallin was killed. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Loos Memorial, Pas de Calais, France, and on the Parish War Memorial, St Peter’s and St Paul’s Church, Coleshill. Private Mallin was posthumously awarded the 1915 Star, Allied Victory and British War medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-25 21:44:40

Name: Philip Marshall
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 16th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Sergeant
Date Of Death: 28/10/1917
Notes: Philip Marshall was born in January 1898 in Coleshill. In 1911 Sergeant Marshall was living on Coleshill High St with his parents, William Edge Marshall, a coach builder, and Alice Maude Marshall, his brother and sister, Bertram and Evelyn, and his grandmother, Mary Ryder. Enlisted into ‘C’ company, 16th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 638, Sergeant Marshall was killed in action on 28 October 1917. His death was recorded in the Coleshill Chronicle which stated, It is with the greatest regret that we have to record the death of Sergeant Philip Marshall, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, younger son of Mr and Mrs W. E. Marshall, High Street, Coleshill, who was killed in action on the Western front on Sunday, October 28th. The following account of how Sergeant Marshall met his death is taken from a letter written to his parents from an officer: "On Sunday, October 28th, about 7.20 a.m., I was taking my section to an appointed task. About 100 yards ahead some ten men of the Warwicks were coming towards us. In the rear was the Sergeant (your son). Many German shells were dropping around us, when suddenly one of the 4.1 shells landed probably 3 ft. in front of the sergeant and exploded. When we reached the spot we saw your son lying on the ground. He was wounded in the leg, chest and arms. We did what we could, placing him on a stretcher, with the idea of taking him to the dressing station. However, the shock had been too great, and he died about four minutes after being hit." The officer gave a fine tribute to the departed soldier: "Your son died the death of a true man, and of a soldier doing his duty." All who knew him will feel very deeply his death on the field of battle, and will unite in true sympathy with the bereaved parents. Sergeant Marshall is buried at the Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:18:30
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 27th May 1916 “At the regimental sports of the 16th Royal Warwickshires (City Battalion) recently held in France, Pte. P. Marshall won the prize for the champion bomb thrower of the battalion. Pte. Marshall, who is only 19 years of age, is a son of Mr. Marshall, wheelright, Coleshill, who has another son serving King and Country.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-29 17:21:50
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 21st October 1916 LOCAL PARAGRAPHS Mr and Mrs W E Marshall, of Coleshill, have received an intimation that their son, Private P. Marshall, Birmingham City Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been promoted to Sergeant for meritorious services on the field. Sergeant Marshall’s many friends will be glad to hear of his success and promotion.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 17:01:38
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 13th January 1917 Local Paragraphs Sergt. P. Marshall, younger son of Mr and Mrs W. E. Marshall, Coleshill, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (Birmingham City Battalion) is over on leave from the trenches in France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 09:38:13
Notes: Sergeant Marshall is also remembered on the Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:05:06

Name: Albert Maybury
Year Of Birth: 1881
Unit: 2/4th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 22/8/1917
Notes: Albert Maybury was born in Birmingham in 1881. By 1891 he was residing at the Cottage Homes in Coleshill for pauper children from Birmingham workhouse. Ten years later Private Maybury was a servant to the Williams family. By 1911 he was living on Coleshill High Street with his employer, John Summerfield, for whom he delivered bread. He was enlisted in Coleshill into the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service number 5998) and on arriving in France was transferred to the 2/4th Battalion, Oxford and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (service number 33009). Private Maybury was killed in action on 22 August 1917, and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium. Albert Maybury was the inaugural Band Master and a Cornet Player in the Coleshill Brass Band at its formation in 1902
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-05 21:06:25
Notes: Local Soldiers Reported Missing Private A. Maybury, Oxford and Bucks. Regiment, is also reported missing. Mr. J. B. Summerfield, baker, Coleshill, with whom Private Maybury was employed, received an official intimation during the week. Private Maybury was in hospital in this country last winter, after several months in France. Before enlisting he was bandmaster of the Coleshill Brass Band. Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, September 29, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-20 11:37:42
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 25th November 1916. Private Albert Maybury, formerly employed at Mr J. B. Summerfield’s, Coleshill, and well known as conductor of the Coleshill Brass Band, writes an interesting letter from France. He wishes all his old friends the compliments of the Christmas season, and continues: “After we came from England I was transferred to the Oxford and Bucks. My address is 33009, Oxford and Bucks, L.I., B.E.F., France. Our battalion is out of the trenches at present for a rest, but I expect we shall be going back again soon. I was in an engagement not long ago. It was hot for a bit, but the Germans found us a bit hot, too. I came out without a scratch. We have morning and evening services while we are not in the trenches; and it would be nice if we had a band to lead us. There are several bandsmen in this platoon. I only wish we had got instruments. We have a lot of rain out here, and talk about mud! It’s up to your knees in places. I expect it will be a very quiet Christmas again. I guess we shall be in the trenches then, but we must keep on smiling.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:07:27

Name: Edward McDermott
Year Of Birth: 1899
Unit: 14th (Service) Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 17/7/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church.\\r\\nEdward McDermott was born in Birmingham in 1899 and baptised on 27th September 1899, also in Birmingham. His parents were Edward and Catherine (Kate) McDermott of Birmingham. His father was a bricklayer and died in 1901 when Edward was just two years old. By 1911 Edward was living in the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill. He enlisted in the 14th (Service) Battalion of the Gloucestershire Regiment at Birmingham (service number 24044). Private McDermott died of wounds received in Western Europe on 17th July 1916 and is remembered in the Dive Copse British Cemetery, Somme, France. He was awarded the Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: SToon on 2015-02-09 20:13:52

Name: Henry McEwan
Year Of Birth: 1894
Unit: 5th Battalion Canadian Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 9/4/1917

Name: William Edward Meagher
Year Of Birth: 1888
Unit: 1/5th (Territorial) Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 18/8/1916
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. William Edward Meagher was born in Guernsey in 1888, and was the son of William and Julia Meagher. By 1901 he was living at the St Paul’s Home in Coleshill, working as a half time Tailor and student. He enlisted in the 1/5th (Territorial) Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Birmingham (service numbers 3012 and 200766) and first served in France on the 25th June 1915. Private Meagher was killed in action in France & Flanders on 18th August 1916 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British and Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-03 14:47:36
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 26, Spring 1917 War Records With feelings of the deepest sorrow, we chronicle the deaths of the following of our old boys:- William Meagher died of his wounds while being borne to the dressing station at the base. “Billy” was a prime favourite in the Home, among the young and old, and was one of the first boys to enter St Vincent’s, Moseley Road.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-29 18:47:39

Name: Frederick James Mellish
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 297th Siege Bty., Royal Garrison Artillery
Rank: Signaller
Date Of Death: 26/9/1918

Name: George Humphrey Moseley
Year Of Birth: 1891
Unit: D Battery, 23rd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery
Rank: Sergeant
Date Of Death: 11/3/1917
Notes: Humphrey George Moseley was born in July 1891 to George and Mary Ann Moseley in Balsall. In 1911 Sergeant Moseley was living with his parents and four sisters at Maxstoke Mill. He worked as a farm labourer before enlisting in 1915 into ‘D’ battery, 23rd brigade, Royal Field Artillery. Sergeant Moseley, service number 65250, died of his wounds on 11 March 1917 and is buried at St Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:20:05

Name: Benjamin Llewellyn Needham
Year Of Birth: 1881
Unit: 2nd Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment
Rank: Captain
Date Of Death: 1/7/1916
Notes: Benjamin Llewellyn Needham was born in 1881 and was the second youngest child of Jonathan and Catherine Louisa Needham of High Street, Coleshill. Jonathan Needham was a Workhouse Master in 1871 and by 1891 he was the Registrar of Births and Deaths, a position which he held until his retirement. Benjamin appears to have left home quite young, and at the time of his marriage in 1910, was already a soldier, living at the Barossa Barracks in Aldershot. On 2nd February 1910 he married Muriel May Hurst at Hounslow, Middlesex. They were both living at the Victoria Barracks, Portsmouth at the time of the 1911 census, along with their baby son Eric Randolf Needham, who was born in Portsea in 1910. They had a second child, Kenneth Norman Needham, who was born in Brentford, Middlesex, in 1915. Benjamin was in the 2nd Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment and landed at Le Havre on the 6th November 1914. Captain Benjamin Llewellyn Needham was killed in action on the 1st July 1916. He was awarded the Victory, British and 1914 Star medals and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-02-17 21:54:06
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 1st April 1916 Military News “Lieut. Ben Needham was gazetted captain in the 2nd Lincolnshire Regiment (now at the front) on February 14th. This further promotion for a Coleshill solider will be a matter of interest to his many friends in the district.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-29 17:19:17
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 22nd July 1916 DEATH OF CAPTAIN NEEDHAM KILLED DURING THE GREAT ADVANCE “It is with deep regret we record the death of Captain B. L. Needham, 2nd Lincoln Regiment, who was killed in action on July 1st, during the great offensive movement by the British Forces. The deceased was the son of Mrs. Needham and the late Mr. J. Needham, who was Registrar for Coleshill District, and received his education at Coleshill Grammar School. He joined the army on the outbreak of the Boer War, and subsequently went with his regiment (the Lincolns) to Gibraltar and Bermuda at the outbreak of the present war, and landed in France in November, 1914, where Mr. Needham was at once promoted from quarter-master-sergeant to second lieutenant. He was wounded at Neuve Chapelle, and after recovery went back last autumn at his own request, and was promoted to a lieutenancy. In February he was given the rank of captain. He leaves a wife and three young children. In a letter to Captain Needham’s wife Lieut.-Colonel Bastard says:- ‘Dear Mrs. Needham, - It is with the deepest sorrow I write to tell you I am afraid your husband is killed. He was seen to fall, hit through the head, by Lieut. Lilley and several of the company, and from the inquiries I have made I am afraid there is no hope. I don’t think even you can know what a loss he is to the regiment; the way he ran his company was beyond praise, and he made it the best in the battalion. His men did splendidly the day of the attack, which was greatly due to his excellent training; and I am sure he died as he would have wished – leading the men he loved and who loved him to the assault. I have lost a real good officer and friend in him, and so can realise what your loss must be. He was just fine, and an inestimable loss to us and the regiment. - Yours sincerely (signed) R. Bastard, Lieut.-Colonel.’ Another brother, Sergt.-Major Needham, R.F.A., has just landed in France after service in Gallipoli and Mesopotamia.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-29 17:20:26
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 22nd July 1916 ROLL OF HONOUR OFFICERS KILLED CAPTAIN B. L. NEEDHAM Captain B. L. Needham, Lincolnshire Regiment (officially reported killed), was a brother of Mr H R Needham, Salisbury Road, Saltley. He was educated a t Coleshill Grammar School. He leaves a widow and three young children and a widowed mother, who live at Coleshill. Another brother is a sergeant-major in the R.F.A. In a letter to Mrs Needham Lieut.-Colonel Bastard says: “I don’t think even you can know what a loss he is to the regiment. The way he ran his company was beyond praise, and he made it the best in the battalion. His men did splendidly the day of the attack, which was greatly due to his excellent training, and I am sure he died as he would have wished, leading the men he loved and who loved him to the assault.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 15:58:13
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 7th November 1914 PROMOTION FOR COLESHILL SOLDIER During the present week news has been received that Benjamin Llewellyn Needham, of Coleshill, Quartermaster-Sergeant, now on active service with the 2nd Lincolnshire Regiment at the war, has been promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. He joined his present regiment during the South African war, and took part in the fighting just before the conclusion of that war. He has been in Bermuda for two years, the regiment being recalled at the commencement of hostilities. His many friends in Coleshill will be pleased to hear of his success, and will join in the wish that he may be spared to enjoy the benefits of it.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 17:27:18
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 20th March 1915 COLESHILL AND THE WAR Lieut. B. L. Needham was wounded in the right arm and shoulder on Wednesday last while leading his men into action. He is now in hospital at Sussex Lodge, Regent’s Park.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 09:09:51
Notes: Captain Needham is also remembered on the Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:06:07

Name: Charles Peter Nevill
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 22nd Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 15/11/1915
Notes: Charles Peter Nevill, known as Peter, was born in Harlaston, Staffordshire, in 1887. He was the son of John Nevill, a wheelwright, and Emma. In 1891 Peter was living with his parents and three brothers at the Old Toll Gate House in Harlaston. By 1901 the family had moved to Back Lane, Coleshill, and were parishioners of St Teresa and the Sacred Heart. Peter and his older brother Felix were working at a Mineral Water Works. The 1911 census shows that the family were living on High Street, Coleshill. At this time Peter and Felix were working as platelayers for the Midland Railway Company. Peter married Florence Ellen Coleman on the 11th August 1913 at St John's Church in Coleshill and in early 1914 their son Peter A Nevill was born. On the 11th January 1915 Charles Peter Nevill enlisted in the RAMC at Birmingham. Private Nevill, service number 49010, was stationed initially at Llandrindod Wells. On 15th May 1915 he arrived in France and served with the 22nd Field Ambulance, forming part of the 7th Division. This was a mobile front line medical unit of the RAMC. These men did not carry weapons or ammunition. Private Nevill was killed by a shell on the 15th November 1915 and is buried in Grave 9 of the Annezin Communal Cemetery in France. He was 28 years old. His wife Florence added the following inscription to his headstone: ‘ In loving memory from his wife and son.’ Private Nevill was posthumously awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals and is remembered on the Parish War Memorial, Coleshill, and the memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:20:51
Notes: Private C. P. Nevill. Further particulars as to the death of Private Charles Peter Nevill (28), R.A.M.C., brother of Mr. R. J. Nevill, of Maxtoke Grange, Lichfield, and of Miss E. Nevill, St. John Street; Lichfield, who as recorded in our last issue, has been killed by a shell while returning to an advanced dressing station in France, have been received. Pte. Nevill and two comrades were walking along when they heard a shell coming. Pte. Nevill's companions lay down on the left side if the road, while he himself crouched down just inside the door of a house on the right side. The shell struck the roof of the house and passed right through, several large fragments striking the deceased in the back and killing him instantly. Deceased enlisted in January, and went to France in May. Captain J. R. C. Greebes, R. A. M. C., his commanding officer, writing to the deceased's wife, says:- " He was a fine fellow in every way, fearless and steady in danger, and yet a splendid worker and a gentle and capable nurse, and one whom one could trust anywhere. When at rest, in reserve or when living in the trenches, he was always cheery, gentle and uncomplaining, and as the result was sincerely liked and respected both by officers and men." Deceased, who was a native of Harlaston, was a married man and before he enlisted resided at Coleshill.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-17 22:26:56
Notes: Private Charles P Nevill is also commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-10 17:25:09
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 27th November 1915 DEATH OF PRIVATE CHARLES PETER NEVILLE, R.A.M.C. The sad news was received in Coleshill last Friday, November 19th, of the death at the front of Charles Peter Neville, of the R.A.M.C. The news came in a letter from Father Hawarden, one of the Catholic chaplains at the front. Father Hawarden wrote to the late soldier’s wife as follows:- November 16th, 1915. Dear Mrs Neville, - I am very sorry to write that your husband was fatally wounded by a shell yesterday. He died soon after being hit. I said Mass for him this morning, and we buried him with all military honours in the little cemetery close to the Catholic church in the village where he was billeted. It will console you to know that he was at Mass and Holy Communion just a few days ago. He was well prepared for death, and died a hero. All the officers and men of the ambulance send you their heartfelt sympathy. May God comfort you in your sorrow, and help you to bear your heavy grief. – Sincerely yours, F HAWARDEN, C.F. 22nd Field Ambulance, B.E.F. Some particulars of his death are given in a letter from Private J. W. Balshaw, R.A.M.C., a personal friend of the late Private Neville. Private Balshaw says in his letter:- “Before he met with his accident I had just come from the trenches, and was going down to the drying-room where he was billeted to dry my clothes, as I was wet through up to the thighs with water and clay. On my way to his billet I saw him coming down the road. We were together when the shell burst. I ran into the ditch on the side of the road, and he ran into a house on the opposite side. The shell struck the house. He did not suffer much. He was at rest when we reached him. There were about 90, including officers, N.C.O.s, and men, present at the funeral, and we put him to rest with full military honours. When we come down the line I am going to repair his grave, and I will see if I can get a photo of it and send to you.” Private Neville was 28 years of age. He enlisted from Coleshill in the R.A.M.C. on January 11th, 1915, and was stationed at Llandrindod Wells till May 5th, when he was sent with his company to France. He served in France from that date until the day of his death. He was the fifth son of Mr and Mrs Neville, of Coleshill, and was married on August 11th, 1913. Widespread sympathy is felt for his parents, and widow and child, in their sad loss. A Requiem Mass was said for him at the Catholic Church, Coleshill, on Monday morning.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-04 15:21:35
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 11th December 1915 DEATH OF PRIVATE C. P. NEVILLE The widow of Private Charles Peter Neville, R.A.M.C., who was killed on November 15th, has received a letter from the captain in command, giving further details as to the manner in which her husband met his death. The letter says:- 27th November, 1915 Dear Mrs Neville, - Private Bateman showed me the letter you sent him, and I should like to be allowed also to offer you my sincerest sympathy in your loss. Your husband has been in my section, and under my command, ever since he joined the ambulance in May, and during that time I have been in daily, often hourly, touch with him, and having many opportunities of seeing him under all conditions, came to value him at his true worth. He was a fine fellow in every way, fearless and steady in danger, and yet a splendid worker, and a gentle and capable nurse, and one whom one could trust anywhere. When at rest in reserve, or when living in the trenches, he was always cheery, gentle, and un-complaining, and as the result was universally liked and respected both by officers and men. He was returning to the advance dressing station after doing a morning’s work in the drying room with two of his comrades, when he was caught by the shell which killed him. Apparently they were walking along the road when they heard the shell coming. The other two ran and lay down on the left side of the road, while your husband crouched down just inside the door of a house on the right side. The shell hit the roof of the house and it passed right through; several large fragments hit him in the back and killed him instantaneously. I was there within a few minutes, but there was nothing to be done, and his injuries were such that there is no possibility of his having suffered at all. I know that it is impossible for me to realise what it means to you, but I know that I have lost a good friend, and should like again to assure you of the sympathy of the whole ambulance. – Yours sincerely, JAMES R.C. GREENVERS, Capt. R.A.M.C.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-04 15:22:16

Name: Felix John Nevill
Year Of Birth: 1885
Unit: Machine Gun Corps / Coldstream Guards
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 7/4/1918
Notes: Felix John Nevill, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Nevill, High Street, Coleshill, died recently in a London Hospital from the effects of being gassed while on active service in France. He joined the Coldstream Guards nine years ago, and was with his Regiment in the Expedition Force in 1914. He was discharged as unfit for further service in the Army a short time ago, and took up civil employment. He was thirty-three years of age, and leaves a wife and one child. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, June 1, 1918
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-17 13:48:26
Notes: Private Felix J Nevill is also commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-10 17:23:56

Name: Harry Nicholds
Year Of Birth: 1873
Unit: 9th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 25/9/1916
Notes: Harry Nicholds was the son of Mark and Caroline Nicholds of Coleshill. He was born in Coleshill in 1873 and in 1891 he was recorded as a 'Platelayer on Railway.' By 1901 he was still living with his parents on Coventry Road, Coleshill, and is recorded as a 'navvy' (a manual labourer working on a civil engineering project, in this case probably the railway). Harry joined the 9th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (service number 12382) and was injured in the Battle of the Somme. Private Harry Nicholds died of his wounds on 25th September 1916. He is remembered on the Puchevillers British Cemetery, France.
Notes added by: KW on 2014-02-23 18:07:52
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 14th October 1916 DEATHS NICHOLDS – Private H. Nicholds, West Yorks Regiment, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Nicholds, Pound House, died of wounds received in action September 25th 1916. “Greater love hath no man than this.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:58:06
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 22nd September 1917 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM NICHOLDS – In loving memory of our dear brother, Private Harry Nicholds, who died of wounds, in France, September 26th 1916. He nobly answered duty’s call, And gave his life for one and all. -From his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 18:56:35
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 28th September 1918 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM NICHOLDS – In memory of Private Harry Nicholds, West Yorkshire Regiment, who died for his country, September 26th [sic] 1916. From his loving Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 08:31:30
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 25th September 1920 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM NICHOLDS – In loving memory of Harry Nicholds, late Private 9th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment, died of wounds in France September 26th 1916 [sic]. Always lovingly remembered by Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sisters.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-21 14:54:54

Name: John Henry Nightingale
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: Welch Regiment
Rank: L/Corporal
Date Of Death: 31/8/1916
Notes: John Henry Nightingale was born in Over Whitacre in 1892, and christened on the 19th June 1892. His parents were John Charles Nightingale and Harriett Pallet, who were married later the same year. John Henry attended the Coleshill Parochial School and then became an underground coal miner. He worked for a time at Kingsbury Colliery. By the outbreak of war, John had disappeared from Coleshill and enlisted under a false name in Hengoed, Glamorgan in the 16th Battalion Welsh Regiment (service number 23991), also known as the Cardiff City Battalion. The Battalion was formed at Cardiff in November 1914, completed training at Colwyn Bay and Winchester and landed at Le Havre in France in December 1915. John Henry Nightingale first served in France on the 4th December 1915. Lance Corporal Nightingale was killed in action on 31st August 1916, aged 24, and is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British medals and is also remembered on the Parochial School Memorial in the Old Market Hall, Coleshill.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-03-19 16:58:38
Notes: Battalion War Diary entry for 31/8/16: Night. Relieved by 17/RWF. B.Coy left at Bn. H.Qrs. 17/RWF A.Coy & H.Qrs. to Machine Gun Farm. C & D Coys to Canal Bank.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-08-30 15:37:16

Name: Francis Campbell Norbury
Year Of Birth: 1882
Unit: 6th Battalion attd. 1st Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps
Rank: Captain
Date Of Death: 8/1/1915
Notes: Francis Campbell Norbury was born on 16th January 1882 in Stratford-on-Avon to parents Thomas and Eliza. He attended the Coleshill Grammar School, the Oundle School and went on to attend St John’s College, Cambridge. He returned to Oundle as a house-master after gaining his degree. Whilst at Cambridge Francis joined the Officer Training Corps, and on returning to Oundle joined their Corps as a Colour-Seargent. After taking a commission he was promoted to Senior Captain. In the autumn of 1914 Captain Norbury joined a Reserve Battalion of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, and was soon chosen to take a large draft of men to France. He first served in France on 24th November 1914 and soon afterwards took charge of a Company of the 1st Battalion. Captain Norbury was killed in action when a shell landed in his dug-out near Bethune, France, on 8th January 1915. He was 32 years old. He is buried in Le Touret Military Cemetery, Plot I, Row E, Grave 19 and was posthumously awarded the 1914-15 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals. He is also remembered on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial in the Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-10 22:34:42
Notes: Birmingham Daily Post 14th January 1915 CAPTAIN FRANCIS CAMPBELL NORBURY Captain Francis Campbell Norbury, King’s Royal Rifle Corps (killed in action near Bethune on January 8) was originally in one of the Oundle School companies on the Terratorial unattached list. From the Officers’ Training Corps he was gazetted to the 1st Battalion of the King’s Royal Rifles on October 21 of last year. He was the youngest son of Mr and Mrs T. W. Norbury, The Lench House, Stratford-on-Avon.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-10 22:35:58
Notes: Birmingham Daily Post 16th January 1915 DEATH OF A STRATFORD-ON-AVON OFFICER The death is reported of Captain Francis Campbell Norbury, youngest son of Mr and Mrs T. W. Norbury, of Lench House, Stratford-on-Avon. At the outbreak of the war he held a captain’s commission in the Officers’ Training Corps, and was gazetted captain in the King’s Royal Rifles on October 21 last. The following tribute to his popularity was paid by the commanding officer in a letter to his father:- “I cannot tell you how well and gallantly your dear boy commanded C Company of my battalion ever since he came out, most ably helping me to make good soldiers out of nearly raw material of special reservists enlisted or embodied mostly only since the war began….. A shell fell this afternoon (January 8) into the dug-out in which your boy was resting at Bethune, and to our great grief he was instantaneously killed….. He had been with us only a short time, but he had made himself beloved and respected by us all, and had proved himself a brave and capable officer. I feel his loss and your sorrow most deeply.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-10 22:36:54
Notes: From the Oundle School Archive The Laxtonian 1915 KILLED ON ACTIVE SERVICE Captain F. C. NORBURY, K.R.R.C.; born 16th January, 1882; entered Laxton, September, 1896; entered St. John’s College, Cambridge, October, 1901; appointed to the School staff September 1904; joined the K.R.R.C., October 1914; killed near Bethune, 8th January, 1915.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-13 21:28:55

Name: Thomas O'Grady
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 3rd and 2nd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 7/7/1915
Notes: Thomas O’Grady was born in 1895 to Mary O’Grady. By 1901 he was living in the St Paul’s Home for Boys in Coleshill. In October 1909, aged 14, Thomas moved to the St Vincent’s Home on Moseley Road, Birmingham, where he worked for Messrs. H. J. Pratt & Co., Skinner Lane, as an Art Metal Worker. In April 1913 Thomas left St Vincent’s to join the Army. Thomas O’Grady enlisted in Bury, Lancashire, giving his home address as Middlewich, Cheshire (probably his mother’s address). Private O’Grady served initially with the 3rd (Service Battalion) of the Lancashire Fusiliers. He later joined the 2nd Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, probably as part of a draft of reinforcements, and first served in France on the 8th January 1915. Private O’Grady was killed in action on the 7th July 1915 and is remembered on Panel 33 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. He was posthumously awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals, and is also remembered on the Memorial in the Church of the Sacred Heart and St Teresa, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-12-21 19:05:04
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No.21, 1915. “Thomas O’Grady was admitted to St Vincent’s in October 1909. He was one of St Vincent’s best football players and a great favourite with all. He left to join the army in April 1913. His colonel wrote to St Vincent’s informing us of his death in action. RIP.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-12-21 19:05:45
Notes: Birmingham Daily Mail 27th and 28th September 1915 “LOCAL ROLL OF HONOUR Information has been received by relatives of the deaths of:- Private Thomas O’Grady (20), Lancashire Fusiliers. He was a member of St Vincent’s Home, Moseley Road, Birmingham. His sister, who resides in Birmingham, is asked to communicate with Mr Beck, the superintendent.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-12-21 19:06:23

Name: John Wallace Palmer
Year Of Birth: 1873
Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 19/12/1914
Notes: John Wallace Palmer was one of a number of children of Jessie and Sarah Palmer. Born in January 1873 in Alvechurch, Worcestershire, Private Palmer lived with his wife Eda in Aston before moving to Shustoke Green. He worked as a domestic gardener and in 1911 is listed as having two children, Nellie and Annie. Private Palmer enlisted in Birmingham into the 2nd battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 3982 and was killed in action on 19 December 1914. He is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:21:32
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 22nd December 1917 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM PALMER – In loving memory of Pte. John Wallis [sic] Palmer, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (beloved husband of Edith Palmer), killed in action in France December 19th, 1914. Ever remembered by his loving wife and children.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 22:04:01
Notes: Coleshill Chroncile 23rd January 1915 KILLED IN ACTION We regret to learn that Private J. Palmer, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on December 15th, although intimation was not received by his wife in Coleshill until last Friday morning. Palmer was a reservist, and almost immediately after the outbreak of the war rejoined his regiment at Warwick. After a short stay there he was sent to the Isle of Wight for training, and he had not long been with the active forces when he met his death. This is the first of the Coleshill contingent to be killed.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-20 09:05:26

Name: Peter Patterson
Year Of Birth: 1886
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers
Rank: Company Sergeant Major
Date Of Death: 22/6/1916
Notes: Peter (Patterson) Pattison was born in Llynelly, Carnarvon, in 1886. He grew up in the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, which he left in 1897, when he joined the Army. Peter enlisted at Bootle in the 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers (service number 8731). He served in the Boer War, and in 1911 was serving as a Corporal with the British Army in India. Company Segeant Major Pattison was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal in June 1916 “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty since the commencement of the campaign.” The day after this citation was published in the London Gazette, CSM Pattison was killed in action and is remembered on the Loos Memorial, France. He was also awarded the British and Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-23 21:17:22
Notes: 8731 CSM Peter PATTISON DCM of Llynelly, Caernarfon. B Company 2 RWF. One of over 40 casualties when the enemy exploded a mine under the Company’s trench at Givenchy on 22 June 1916 (later known as Red Dragon Crater).
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-23 21:18:28
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 23, Summer 1916 We regret very much that Quarter-Master-Sergeant Peter Pattison and William Crewe have fallen in action. Peter Pattison left St Paul’s Home in 1897. He was in the Regular Army and was through the Boer War. He has served in France since the outbreak of war, won the DCM at the Battle of Loos, and was mentioned on six different occasions for conspicuous gallantry…. His record is a fine one. He was the second of our Old Boys to win the Distinguished Conduct Medal, a fact of which we are very proud.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-23 21:22:09

Name: Charles Powell
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: 16th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 13/9/1916
Notes: Remembered on the plaque in the Catholic Church, Charles Powell was born on 2nd May 1897 in Dudley, Staffordshire. By 1901 he was living with his three older siblings in the Dudley Union Workhouse, Burton Road, Sedgely. He went to live at the St Paul’s Home in Coleshill, Warwickshire on 1st May 1911, and was discharged to his Uncle on the 25th June 1912. Charles Powell enlisted in the 16th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Birmingham (service number 3630) after the outbreak of war. Private Powell was killed in action on 3rd September 1916 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France. He was awarded the Allied Victory and British War medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-09-21 13:42:06

Name: Brian Christopher Power
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 14th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: L/Corporal
Date Of Death: 23/7/1916
Notes: Brian Christopher Power was born in Coleshill in April 1896. The son of Frederick Arthur Power, a wire manufacturer, and his wife Ellen Mary, Lance Corporal Power was enlisted in to the 14th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 296. He was killed in action on 23 July 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:22:32
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 30th September 1916 Missing Power, Lce.-corpl. B. C., Coleshill
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:48:17

Name: Stanley Eric Pratt
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 1st Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/5/1918
Notes: Stanley Eric Pratt was born in July 1898 in Coleshill. The son of Percy Harry and Emily Pratt, Private Pratt enlisted at Sutton Coldfield and joined the 1st battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, service number 235285. He was killed in action on 27 May 1918 and is buried at La Ville-aux-Bois British cemetery, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:22:03
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 4th January 1919 KILLED IN ACTION Mrs H P Pratt, of Coleshill, has received information that her youngest son, Pte. Eric Pratt, Royal Warwickshire [sic. should read Worcestershire] Regt., was killed in action in France on May 27th last. The War Office had previously reported him missing, and the sad news conveyed was received through the agency of the British Red Cross Society from a soldier comrade who was near him when he was instantly killed by a shell. Private Pratt was only 19 years of age, and received his education at Coleshill Grammar School. He joined up in 1917, as soon as he was 18, and after training was sent out, early in 1918, to France, at the time of the great German offensive. The sympathy of a wide circle of friends will be extended to Mrs Pratt and family in their loss after so long and anxious a time of waiting for news.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-03 21:57:53
Notes: Private Pratt is also remembered on the Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:07:12

Name: William Albert Preston
Year Of Birth: 1893
Unit: 14th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: L/Corporal
Date Of Death: 23/7/1916
Notes: William Albert Preston was born in October 1893 on Harnall Lane, Coventry. The son of Albert Preston, a plumber, and his wife, Jane Annie, Lance Corporal Preston initially lived in Corley before moving to Coleshill sometime before 1911. He worked as a wood and metal engraver before enlisting in the 14th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 131. He was killed in action with Lance Corporal Power on 23 July 1916. He is also commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:22:58
Notes: Coleshill And The War. Death of Lance-Corporal Preston. It is with sincere regret that we have heard that Mr. Preston, Coventry Road, has now received official intimation assuming the death of his elder son, Lce.-corpl. William Preston, who has been reported missing since July 23rd, 1916. He voluntarily joined the Birmingham City Battalion at the outbreak of the war. No definite information respecting him has been known since one of the battles of the Somme, ten months ago. At the Coleshill Parochial Boys' School Lce.-corpl. Preston showed artistic skill quite above the average. Upon leaving school he was apprenticed to a metal engraver and designer, His original designs being greatly appreciated by the head of the firm. He had every prospect of a prosperous and distinguished career as designer in commercial art, while his unassuming and gentlemanly manner endeared him to all his associates. His brother Frank is now serving at the front. Coleshill Chronicle. Saturday, May 26th, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-19 13:54:21
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 15th April 1916 SOLDIER’S CHEERY LETTER ‘THE HOUSE BEAUTIFUL’ “The following is an extract from a letter by Lance-Corporal W. A. Preston, 1st City Battalion 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, to his parents, residing at Coventry Road, Coleshill:- ‘I have a piece of shrapnel for you that nearly put me out of gear, just missed by inches. It is a very ugly looking piece. I have just received the cigarettes…I had not even a fag end until yours arrived. However we are all perfectly happy. We even have a tablecloth on our table, to say nothing of a hallstand. It is surprising how we adapt ourselves to the most trying circumstances. I have decorated our ‘hotel’ up with drawings of various descriptions which even caused the major to smile when he came round…You ought to see our house; it is absolutely ‘it’. We even have flowers on the window-sill. It is strange how the flowers manage to survive in the poor dilapidated garden. We never get down-hearted here. What do you think of the pleadings of some of the conscientious objectors? I wish we had them here. I enclose a small crucifix made out of a German shell (nose-cap). I met H. Drakeford, and he looks very well.” H A Drakeford is also recorded on the Coleshill Memorial.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-29 17:24:00
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 9th September 1916 Lance-Corporal W. Preston, Royal Warwicks, Birmingham City Battalion, is officially reported missing. His parents reside in Coventry Road, Coleshill, and they are anxiously awaiting further news.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:42:36
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 26th May 1917 IN MEMORIAM PRESTON – In loving memory of Lance-Corporal W. A. Preston, 14th Royal Warwicks, eldest son of Mr and Mrs A. Preston, Coventry Road, Coleshill, who fell in action July 23rd, 1916, aged 22 years.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 08:47:19
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 7th July 1917 The death is announced of Lance-Corporal W. A. Preston, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, eldest son of Mr and Mrs A. Preston, 17, Coventry Road, Coleshill, who joined a Birmingham City Battalion on its formation. Mr and Mrs Preston have another son serving in France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 09:17:20

Name: Sidney George Prosser
Year Of Birth: 1874
Unit: 19th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 27/7/1916
Notes: Sidney George Prosser was born in April 1874 in Coleshill. The son of Joseph and Mary, Private Prosser married Edith Swan in April 1902. A member of 19th battalion, Australian Infantry, A.I.F., Private Prosser (service number 1274) died on 27 July 1916 and is buried at Pozieres British Cemetery, Ovillers-La Boisselle, France. He was awarded the 1914/15 Star, British and Victory medals.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:23:28
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 16th September 1916 DEATH OF A COLESHILL ANZAC IN FRANCE SIDNEY GEORGE PROSSER, SON OF THE LATE J. R. PROSSER Official news has just been received by his wife of the death (in action) of Corpl. Sidney George Prosser, who was killed in the great push in France on July 27th, 1916. Corpl. Prosser must have seen very rough times in France, as he had been in all the thick of the fighting since the arrival of the Anzacs there, and was on the next list for leave to visit his wife and family, when the order came for all furlough to be stopped. This was naturally a great disappointment to his family and friends. The only consolation to them all is that he died nobly fighting for his country. He volunteered in Sydney, where he joined the Anzacs nearly two years ago, and went straight to Gallipoli (where he was twice wounded, once in the head and once in the arm). He was then transferred to Egypt, and thence to France, where he so valiantly died. Corpl. Prosser went out to Australia about five years ago to open out a new business, in which he was quite successful, having secured the sole and exclusive rights of three new articles of great utility and demand for the whole of the Australasian market. On December 17th, 1913, a great fire broke out at Messrs. Williams Brothers’ grand new buildings (which was once of the sights of Sydney), in which damage was done to the extent of £100,000. Mr Prosser had unfortunately taken a large suite of rooms there, and only the day before the fire occurred had moved all his stock into them. He had no time to take out new insurance policies. Next morning only one wall was left standing, all being totally lost. He was about to make a journey through New Zealand and then join the writer in his business when war broke out. He at once volunteered for service, to meet his glorious death fighting with the brave Anzacs in France. He leaves a widow and two children, by whom he is deeply mourned. – E.SWAN.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:04:01

Name: Charles Randle
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 11th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 22/2/1916
Notes: Charles Randle was born in Coleshill in 1898, the son of Charles and Mary Randle. Private Randle enlisted into the 11th battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, service number, 16159. He died on 22 February 1916 and is buried at Salonika Cemetery, Greece.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:25:11

Name: Oliver Jephcott Randle
Year Of Birth: 1890
Unit: 10th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: L/Corporal
Date Of Death: 18/11/1916
Notes: Oliver Jephcott Randle was born in 1890 in Great Wolford to Fred and Mary Ann Randle. He enlisted at Coventry, stating he lived at 13 Coventry Road, Coleshill, and joined the 10th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 16635. Lance Corporal Randle was killed in action on 18 November 1916 and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:25:40
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 23rd December 1916 Information was received a few days ago by Reserve-Police constable and Mrs F Randle, of Coventry Road, Coleshill, that their son, Lance-Corporal O Randle, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was wounded in action, in France, on November 18th. Prior to enlisting in H.M. Forces Lance-Corporal Randle was a police-constable in the Coventry City Force.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 17:19:35
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 22nd December 1917 COLESHILL SOLDIER MISSING Mr and Mrs Fred Randle, of Coventry Road, Coleshill, have received official intimation that their son Lce.-corpl. Oliver Randle (27), has been missing since November 18th, 1916, and the Army Council conclude that his death took place on that date, killed in action at Grandecourt. Before enlisting in the army Lce.-corpl. Randle was in the Coventry City Police Force, and a letter of sympathy to Mr and Mrs Randle was sent by the Chief Constable for that city with an expression of regret at the loss sustained by the county and the force.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 19:10:28
Notes: I am a great niece of Oliver J Randle and I now live in Coleshill. I am researching the Randle family tree and would like to know when Oliver joined Coventry Police prior to him enlisting as a soldier. I have been to the Thiepval memorial in France to view his name and walk the fields where he was killed;a very moving experience. I am also anxious to trace the war diary to try and find out how he died. My grandmother , Frances, was very close to her big brother Oliver. Apparently there are 2 Randle families in Coleshill; I would love to get in touch. My family plan to attend the'vigil' for Oliver on 18th November and are very grateful for this opportunity to honour out Great Uncle's memory. Will try and arrange for a photograph of Oliver to appear on the website.
Notes added by: Stephanie Clenton on 2016-06-22 16:39:22

Name: Joseph Arthur Richards
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 1st/8th Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Captain
Date Of Death: 4/11/1918
Notes: Frrom the 1911 Census for Shustoke he was born 1893 in Tenterden, Kent Employed as a Student Teacher In 1911 he lived at The Post Office, Shustoke. Mother Ann was sub postmistress at that time. Father James was a certified (head) teacher at unknown elementary school. He is listed on the Shustoke War Memorial - http://www.nnwfhs.org.uk/catch-all/first-world-war-centenary-2/war-memorial-transcriptions-p-w/shustoke He is buried at Landrecies British Cemetery, France
Notes added by: Ian Shuter on 2016-11-17 00:23:29

Name: John Royston
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 43rd Regiment Canadian Militia
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 10/8/1915
Notes: John Royston was born in July 1896, probably in Birmingham, to parents John and Harriet Royston. His father, a Brushmaker/ Enameller, died in 1899 in the Infirmary of the Birmingham Workhouse. His mother died three years later, leaving John to be cared for by his grandmother Bridget Royston. When she became ill and was sent to the Workhouse, John went to live with his Uncle George and Aunt Selina in Warwick Street, Birmingham, but this arrangement did not work out and John was taken under the care of the Aston Guardians. The Aston Guardians sent John to live at St Paul’s Home, Coleshill, on the 3rd May 1905, and he made his first Holy Communion on 8th December 1909. John was emigrated to Canada by the Catholic Emigration Association, sailing from Liverpool on the Corsican on the 21st April 1910 and arriving in Quebec on the 30th April 1910. He would have initially been sent to the St George’s Home (a receiving Home for emigrated Catholic children) and from there was sent to live with a family in Ottawa, Ontario where he worked in market gardening. He was discharged from the care of the Catholic Homes on the 31st December 1914, when he had reached the age of 18. Following the outbreak of war, John Royston enlisted in the 43rd Canadian Militia on the 31st July 1915. He died only ten days later, whilst still in Canada, after a swimming accident in the Ottawa River. It is likely that he enlisted in the 43rd Regiment, 77th overseas Battalion, but died before he had been fully attested. Private Royston drowned on the 10th August 1915 and was buried after a military funeral in Section AR 27, Grave 23 of the Ottawa Beechwood Cemetery. He is remembered on the War Memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-02 19:34:08
Notes: Ottawa Journal 11th August 1915 SOLDIERS DIVE FOR BODY OF COMRADE Remains of Second Victim of Double Drowning in Ottawa Not Yet Recovered Up to noon to-day the body of Private W. J. Royston, of the 77th Battalion, CEF, who, together with Private john McLean, was drowned in the Ottawa River near the foot of Bank street, had not been found, despite the organised search of members of the 77th Battalion all last evening and this morning. Willing hands were lent to the search in the dozen or more young lads, who dived for the body. Shortly after their noon lunch at the Cambridge restaurant yesterday afternoon, the two young soldiers intimated to their companion, Private Nolan, that they intended to go bathing from the pier in the Ottawa River, between Kent and Bank streets. Private Nolan arrived on the scene about one o’clock and found their clothing on the pier but no sign of his companions. After a short search of the neighbourhood he informed his office on Sparks street and then the police. A search was at once instituted and the body of young McLean was discovered by a newsboy who was diving. Alsonso Claude by name, better known in his circle as “Frenchie.” The body was brought to the surface and later removed to Roger and Burney’s morgue. Search for the body of Royston has so far proved fruitless. Pte. McLean, 18 years of age, was born in Kent, England and for some time has lived in Ramsayville, Ont. Pte. Royston, 20 years of age, is also a native of Kent, England, was employed on a farm in the Ottawa district. Both lads enlisted on the last day of July. Parents of both boys predeceased them, but Pte. McLean has a sister living to whom his personal effects will be sent. It is likely that a military funeral will be held for the deceased but so far no arrangements have been made until the other body has been found. Particulars as to how the double drowning occurred are unknown, as the boys were alone in the vicinity when they went bathing. A deep gash was found on McLean’s head when the body was recovered and it is thought he struck a rock when diving. The water at the pier is not very deep.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-02 19:34:56
Notes: Ottawa Journal 13th August 1915 NEWSBOY FINDS BODY OF OTHER SOLDIER WHO WAS DROWNED IN RIVER The body of Pte. W. J. Royston, of the 77th Battalion, who was drowned on Tuesday while bathing in the Ottawa River, was found this morning at 9.15 by a newsboy who was roaming in the vicinity. The body was floating, and was 50 feet to the right of the pier from where it is thought he entered the water. By means of a pole the body was brought to shore and later taken to Roger and Burney’s morgue, Laurier avenue. The funeral was held this afternoon at 2 o’clock from the undertaking parlours.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-08-02 19:35:37

Name: William Bernard Sherwood
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 60th Sqdn., Royal Flying Corps
Rank: Lieutenant
Date Of Death: 27/10/1917

Name: Edward Shine DCM
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 2nd Battalion South Staffs Regiment and Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Date Of Death: 20/10/1918
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Edward Shine was born in 1887 in Middlesborough, Yorkshire. He was the third son of Cornelius (born in Ireland) and Elizabeth Shine of Middlesborough. By 1901 Edward was living at the St Pauls Home Certified School for Boys, Lower High Street, Coleshill. He was recorded as a 'half time Tailor'. Edward enlisted in the 2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment on 16th July 1903 in Birmingham, aged 15 years and 11 months (service number 6849). After training he joined his Regiment in Agfa, India, on 10th February 1904. The Battalion served in India and Burma until 1907, then Pretoria, South Africa, until returning to England in 1911. Corporal Edward Shine was living at the Whittington Barracks near Lichfield in 1911 where he was an infantry soldier with the 2nd Battalion South Staffs Regiment. Edward was married in 1913 to Charlotte and they had a daughter Norah, born in 1913, and a son, Edward J Shine, born in 1915. In 1914 Sergeant Edward Shine was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal "for gallant conduct in 10th September 1914, at Villiers-Cotterets, in assisting a wounded man across open ground for a distance of 800 yards, under a heavy fire." On 30th January 1918 he was made Second Lieutenant and transferred from the South Staffordshire Regiment to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service number 23519). Second Lieutenant Edward Shine DCM of the 15th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment was killed in action on 20th October 1918 and is remembered in the Viesly Communal Cemetery, France. He was awarded the 1914 Star, British and Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-03 15:06:50

Name: Bertie Showell
Year Of Birth: 1880
Unit: 10th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own)
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 1/7/1916
Notes: Bertie Showell was born in January 1880 in Tamworth. The son of John William Showell and his wife Elizabeth, Private Showell enlisted into the 10th battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’ Own), service number 15695, and was killed in action on 1 July 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:26:32
Notes: By 1911 Bertie and his parents were living on Maxstoke Lane, Coleshill, and Bertie was working as a Brick Layer's Labourer.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-16 11:35:05
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 29th July 1916 "Private B. Showell, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Showell, Maxstoke Lane, Coleshill, has been officially reported missing since July 1st.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-29 17:27:15
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 12th August 1916 Mr and Mrs Showell, of Maxstoke Lane, Coleshill, have received official intimation that their son, Private Showell, 10th West Yorks., who had previously been reported missing, was killed in action on July 1st in France. Private Albert Green and Private Joseph Keatley, who enlisted with Private Showell and joined the same regiment soon after the outbreak of the war, were taken prisoners during the same engagement. Their parents have received postcards from Dulmen, Germany, where the two prisoners of war are at present interned.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:00:11
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 30th June 1917 IN MEMORIAM SHOWELL – In loving memory of our dear son, Bert, who was killed in action on July 1st, 1916. He nobly answered his country’s call. SHOWELL – In loving memory of our dear brother, Bert, who was killed in action on July 1st, 1916. From his loving sister and brother, Maud and Harry. SHOWELL – In loving memory of our dear brother, Bert, who fell in action, July 1st, 1916. Silently mourned by brother Charlie, wife, and daughter Daisy. His country called – he answered with his life.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 09:25:15

Name: Hubert Simpson
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 11th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 10/8/1917
Notes: Born April 1898 in Birmingham. Died 10 August 1917. The son of Joseph and Emily Simpson, he joined the 11th battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 20841. He died on 10 August 1917 and is buried in the Voormezeele Enclosure, Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:26:57

Name: Frederick Walter Warren Smith
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 5th Battalion, Canadian Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 9/4/1917
Notes: Frederick Walter Warren Smith was born in October 1895 in Coleshill. The son of Frederick Smith, a gardener, and his wife Sarah, Private Smith worked as a farm labourer and lived on Coleshill High Street with his two sisters and grandfather. He emigrated to Canada in 1912 and enlisted in the 5th battalion, Canadian Infantry, service number 198205. He died on 9 April 1917 and is buried in Nine Elms Military Cemetery, France. Coleshill Chronicle extract: "We regret to record the death of Private F. W. W. Smith, only son of Mr and Mrs Fred Smith, Lower High Street, Coleshill, killed in action at the storming of Vimy Ridge on April 9th. Private Smith was attached to the machine gun section of the 5th battalion Canadian Forces. He was 21 years of age, and left Coleshill five years ago with Mr. H. King, who went out to Nova Scotia, and took up a farm. Private Smith's mother has received the following letter from the battalion chaplain:- ‘Dear Madam,- You will have received the sad notification of the death of your son, Private F.W.W. Smith, of this battalion, at the storming of Vimy Ridge, on April 9th. As a chaplain of the battalion, and one who stood at his graveside, I wish to express to you my sorrow at his loss, and how much I sympathise with you in this distress. I know that all his comrades, both officers and men, would wish to join me in this little message to you. His body and that of his companions of the 5th who so gallantly fell on that day, lies buried in a grave on the battlefield by the side of the Lens-Arras road. -I am, yours sincerely (REV.) D.E.D. Robertson’"
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:27:31
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 12th May 1917 DEATHS SMITH – In loving memory of Frederick Walter Warren, the beloved and only son of Frederick and S. J. Smith, of Coleshill, 5th Battalion Canadians (M.G.S.), who was killed in action in France, April 9th, 1917, aged 21 years. His King and country called him. Sadly mourned by his mother , father, and sisters.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-13 09:34:52
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 10th April 1920 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM SMITH – In loving memory of Private Frederick W. W. Smith, 5th Battalion Canadians, Machine Gun Section, killed in France, April 9th, 1917. Only beloved son of Mr and Mrs F Smith, Coleshill. Lovingly remembered by Mother, Father, and Sisters. Somewhere in France, in an unknown grave, Our dear son lies sleeping; For his King and country his life he gave Into his Saviour’s keeping.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-21 14:48:59
Notes: As you may have noticed on Fred's papers when he first signed up they have the wrong year of birth but the one you have on here is correct. I did not notice this at first but found out when I went to the registry office to order a copy of his birth certificate to add to the family history. It is 1895 not 1894 as his papers show but this was corrected on future paperwork.
Notes added by: Linda Holmes on 2017-04-17 22:30:39

Name: William Smith
Year Of Birth: 1885
Unit: 10th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 3/7/1916
Notes: William Smith was born in Coleshill in 1885 and christened at Coleshill Parish Church on 8th February 1885. His parents, Josiah and Mary Elizabeth Smith, and his grandparents Joseph and Hannah Hastings, lived on Coventry Road, Coleshill. Both William’s father and his grandfather were agricultural labourers. Private William Smith was in the 10th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which formed at Warwick in September 1914, and landed in France on 17th July 1915. William was killed in action on 3rd July 1916 in the Battle of the Somme. He received the Victory and British medals and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-02-16 21:31:58

Name: William Smith RN
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: HMS Goliath
Rank: Stoker 1st Class
Date Of Death: 13/5/1915
Notes: William Forth Smith was born on 28th February 1885 in Birmingham. On the 6th January 1892 William and his younger brother Herbert were sent to live at the St Paul’s Home, Coleshill. They were orphans and came from the Birmingham Workhouse. In May 1899 William was sent from St Paul’s to Oscott College, probably to work as a member of staff. William Smith enlisted in the Royal Navy on the 28th February 1904, having previously worked aboard Steam Ship ‘Arethusa’, probably in the Merchant Navy. He was 16 on enlistment and served as a Boy 1st class (a boy under training) until 1902, service number 217336. He served aboard a number of different ships, and worked his way up as a Signalman, then Stoker 2nd Class and reached Stoker 1st Class by August 1910. He is recorded on the 1911 census aboard HMS Argyll, a First Class Armoured Cruiser, which was stationed at Gibraltar. His work as a Stoker 1st Class would have meant he shovelled coal from a bunker to the firebox; a skilled job that needed strength and precision. Shortly before the outbreak of WW1, William Smith transferred to serve aboard HMS Goliath: a Battleship, Canopus class. The ship sailed from South Africa in February 1915, via Zanzibar, Mombassa, through the Suez canal and saw action off the Dardanelles by April 1915. On the 13th May 1915 HMS Goliath was in action with a Turkish Destroyer, the Muavenet, in the Dardanelles. HMS Goliath was torpedoed and sank quickly, with the loss of 570 men. William Smith was one of those men and his body was never recovered for burial. He was posthumously awarded the Allied Victory and British War medals, and is remembered on the Plymouth Naval Memorial, and also on the memorial in St Teresa and the Sacred Heart, Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-05-12 15:17:23

Name: Oliver Speake
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 28/10/1914
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Oliver Speake was born in Birmingham on 16th December 1897 to Francis and Emily Speake. By 1901 Oliver and his younger brother Ernest were recorded living at the St Paul’s Home in Coleshill. Oliver enlisted into the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment at Birmingham. In 1911 he was a Private living at the Whittington Barracks, Whittington, Lichfield, and recorded as single (service number 1388). Private Speake died of wounds received in Western Europe on 28th October 1914 and is remembered in the Ypres Town Cemetery, Belgium. He was awarded the 1914 Star, Victory and British medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-10 15:54:26
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal No. 22, Spring 1916 Since our last issue we regret to have to record that more have been killed. James Smith, Oliver Speake, William Smith, and Francis Lycett have met their death on the Field of Honour. Oliver Speake came to St Paul’s in August 1900 from Birmingham. He left for St Vincent’s in May 1903, and was discharged from there in June 1905. His mother wrote that he was killed on October 28th, 1914.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-21 20:38:41

Name: Frederick Richard Stanley
Year Of Birth: 1889
Unit: 7th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps
Rank: Rifleman
Date Of Death: 30/7/1915
Notes: Frederick Richard Stanley was born in Coleshill in July 1889. The son of Thomas and Jane Stanley, he attended the Coleshill Church School. In 1911 he was working as a stockman for John Palmer at Springfield Farm, Ansley. He enlisted at Nuneaton into the 7th battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, service number R/721 and was killed in action on 30 July 1915. Rifleman Stanley is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial, Belgium.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:28:04
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 28th August 1915 COLESHILL RIFLEMAN KILLED News has been received by Mr and Mrs Thos. Stanley, of Hawkeswell Lane, Coleshill, that their second son, Rifleman F R Stanley, 7th King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action in France. The sad news was conveyed in a letter from the Quarter-Master-Sergeant dated Aug. 19th. The following letter was written by his friend, Corporal T. Allton, of Nuneaton. “I saw some of Fred’s pals in the 7th K.R.R. and they told me Fred (Stanley) was missing. When I went up to the trenches again last night I inquired again and I was sorry to learn that he was killed. They must have had an awful time of it up there. The German devils were using that burning liquid, and our chaps said it was terrible. It seems hard to think poor Fred is gone, but I was not a bit surprised, for you know these things are, what you might say, an every minute occurrence to us, but I also know it must be a terrible shock to you. It is a horrible thing this war, and no one knows what it is but those out here.” Allton and Stanley enlisted early in September. The deceased soldier was 26 years of age, and was formerly employed at Arley Colliery.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-04 15:50:38
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 31st July 1920 DEATHS IN MEMORIAM STANLEY – In loving memory of our dearly beloved son, Rifleman F R Stanley, of the King’s Royal Rifles, who was killed in action July 30th, 1915. In a lonely grave in France, Our brave young here sleeps; There’s a cottage home in England, Where his mother sits and weeps. He died while doing his duty, And he fought for England’s fame, And on England’s roll of honour, You will find our loved one’s name. -Not forgotten by Father and Mother, Sisters, and Brothers.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-17 16:00:47

Name: James Edward Tennant
Year Of Birth: 1892
Unit: 1/4th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 18/10/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. James Edward Tennant was born in Selly Oak, Birmingham in 1892, the son of John and Elizabeth Tennant. He enlisted in London into the 1/4th (Hallamshire) Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment, service number 9979. Private Tennant first served in France on 15th January 1915, and was killed in action in Western Europe on 18th October 1917. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British and Victory medals and is remembered in the Potijze Chateau Lawn Cemetery, Belgium.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 16:36:08
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 17th November 1917 DEATH OF AN “OLD BOY” OF ST PAUL’S HOME Private James Tennant, Yorkshire and Lancashire Regiment, killed in action, was an old boy of St. Paul’s Home, Coleshill. A brother, Bernard, who was in the Navy, has been killed, two brothers, William and Jack, have been wounded, whilst a younger brother, Fred, has just joined the colours.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 16:36:54

Name: Joseph Bernard Tennant
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: HMS Agincourt
Rank: Able Seaman
Date Of Death: 10/11/1914
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Joseph Bernard Tennant was born on 30th June 1895 in Birmingham, the son of John and Elizabeth Tennant, and brother of James Edward Tennant. He served aboard HMS Agincourt in the Royal Navy, service number J.11936. HMS Agincourt, a Dreadnought battleship, joined the 4th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet on 25th August 1914, first based on Scapa Flow, in the Orkney Islands. Able Seaman Tennant was killed in an accident on 10th November 1914 and is buried in the Flotta Parish Churchyard, Orkney.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 16:42:58
Notes: From findagrave.com: “Royal Navy ships had to "coal ship" as soon as they returned into Scapa Flow from patrol or exercises. Coaling involved all ranks "pitching in" on a dirty, difficult and dangerous task which took its toll on ship crews. Three of the RN sailors buried in Flotta Kirkyard died as a result of accidents while coaling ships. Two Able Seamen of HMS Agincourt, Charles L. Smith and Joseph B. Tennant, died of head injuries on 10th November 1914, probably hit by a coal sling that went "out of control ". Leading Stoker Thomas J Mead of HMS Orion died on 8th November 1914, of skull fracture after falling into a collier hold."
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-19 16:43:32
Notes: St Vincent’s Journal, No. 23, Summer 1916 A Cross. The Captain of HMS Agincourt has written to the sister of B Tennant: “I have to inform you that the Works Department are authorized to erect a simple naval memorial – a concrete maltese cross with inscription plate – to mark the burial of Joseph B Tennant, Able Seaman, who was buried in the Church Yard, Flotta, on the 12th November, 1914.” We are glad to learn that such a mark of respect has been paid to “Barney.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-06-21 15:41:48

Name: Horace Timmins
Year Of Birth: 1894
Unit: 15th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Corporal
Date Of Death: 29/8/1916
Notes: Born December 1894 in Birmingham. Died 29 August 1916. 15 bt, Royal Warwickshire Reg, service number 851. KIA 29 August 1916. Commemorated Theipval.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:28:43
Notes: Horace was the eldest son of James Benjamin and Emma Timmins. James died in 1897 after which Emma and her two children (Horace and Ethel)are recorded living at the Cottage Homes, Marston Green, Coleshill, where Emma was a Foster Mother. By 1911 Horace had moved to Harborne, Birmingham, and was working as a Junior Clerk in the Coal Trade. His mother and sister were still living in Coleshill in 1911.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-23 18:51:44
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 30th September 1916 District Casualties Corporal Horace Timmins, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed on August 29th. He was the only son of Mrs Timmins, of Marston Green, and was 22 years of age.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:45:40

Name: John Townsend
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 7th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps
Rank: Rifleman
Date Of Death: 2/9/1915
Notes: John Townsend, the son of Thomas and Caroline, was born in 1895 in Coleshill. In 1911 Rifleman Townsend was living with his parents and siblings on Packington Lane and was working as a shop assistant. He enlisted in Birmingham into 7th battalion, Kings Royal Rifles. After being injured he was taken to Etaples hospital where he later died of his wounds on 2 September 1915 and is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery, France.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:29:19
Notes: In Memoriam. TOWNSEND.- In loving memory of Rifleman J. Townsend, 7th K.R.R., who was wounded in action July 29th, 1915, and died September 2nd. Not forgotten by father, mother, brothers, and sisters. He answered his duty call. His life he gave for his King and country. Now he is sleeping in peace, perfect peace. Coleshill Chronicle Saturday, September, 1917.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-18 14:14:40
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 18th September 1915 DIED FROM WOUNDS News has been received by Mr and Mrs Townsend, Packington Lane, Coleshill, of the death of their son, Rifleman J. Townsend, King’s Royal Rifles, who was wounded in the Battle of Hooge on July 29th. He died from the wounds on September 2nd. He was 20 years of age.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-04 16:37:13

Name: Alfred Tranter
Year Of Birth: 1891
Unit: 14th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Sergeant
Date Of Death: 21/7/1916
Notes: CWGC Record states him to be Son of Alfred and Martha Susannah Tranter, of The Swan Inn, Martin Hassington, Worcester. Baptised at Coleshill 30 Jan 1891. His Father recorded as a Miller of Forge Mills. In the 1901 Census the family are recorded at Forge Mills Lane, at the Railway Inn Hotel, his Father described Licensed Victualler & Miller. In 1901 the family are recorded as at The Forge Mills Tavern. In the 1911 Census Alfred was recorded as an Articled Clerk, a Visitor at the home of Samuel & Emma Adelaide Johnson of Lyndon Coleshill Rd Sutton Coldfield. His Parents and Sister had relocated to Hassington, Worcester. His older Brother William's location is not known in 1911.
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-23 01:17:57
Notes: Service Number 312 Commemorated at The Thiepval Memorial Somme, France. See CWGC record at: - http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/816914/TRANTER,%20ALFRED Find A Grave Memorial# 12572886 See: - http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=tranter&GSfn=alfred&GSbyrel=all&GSdyrel=all&GScntry=7&GSob=n&GRid=12572886&df=all&
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-23 01:29:30
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 5th August 1916 Information has been received of the death in action in France, on July 22nd [sic], of Sergt. Alfred Tranter, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Sergt. Tranter was the son of Mr and Mrs Tranter, of Martin Hussingtree, near Worcester, and late of Forge Mills, Coleshill. He was educated at Coleshill Grammar School, under the headmastership of the Rev. F. J. Fenn (now serving as a chaplain in France), and on leaving served articles with a firm of chartered accountants in Birmingham, and remained with them until war broke out. Sergt. Tranter had served for three years in the 8th Territorial Battalion of the Warwicks, and on the formation of the city battalions he immediately enlisted, and soon received non-commissioned rank, eventually leaving the camp at Sutton Coldfield for the front in the autumn of last year. He remained with his battalion up to the time of his death, with the exception of one short leave a few weeks ago, and was esteemed by his comrades as a very capable and popular non-commissioned officer.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-05 16:01:36
Notes: Sergeant Tranter is also remembered on the Memorial in The Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-06 16:07:54
Notes: In 1911 Alfred Tranter's brother William was living with his wife Ann and his 4 children in Coleshill.
Notes added by: Jane Tranter on 2014-05-16 18:27:01
Notes: Listed as William Franter in Ancestry.co.uk. Lived in High Street Coleshill in 1911.
Notes added by: Rosie Mayer on 2015-01-13 16:21:35
Notes: Alfred Tranter was born in Coleshill in January 1891 to parents Alfred and Martha Susannah. He was christened on the 30th January 1891 in Coleshill. At this time the family were living in Forge Mills where his father was a licenced victualler and miller at the Railway Inn Hotel. By 1901 the family had moved to the Forge Mills Tavern and Alfred was attending the Coleshill Grammar School. In 1911 Alfred is recorded as an articled clerk to a firm of accountants in Birmingham. The rest of the family had moved to Worcester. In the first week of September 1914 Alfred Tranter was amongst the first group of young men from Coleshill to make the journey into Birmingham to sign up. He enlisted in the Birmingham City Battalion, later to become the 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, service number 312. After completing training, the Battalion landed in France on 21st November 1915. Sergeant Tranter died from wounds received in action on the 21st July 1916, aged 25. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France, the Parish War Memorial, Coleshill, and the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial in the Coleshill School. Sergeant Tranter was posthumously awarded the 1915 Star, British War and Allied Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-03-01 11:15:22

Name: William Hannibal Tyacke
Year Of Birth: 1895
Unit: 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 9/1/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial, William Hannibal Tyacke was born in Coleshill in 1895 to parents Richard and Lois Ann Tyacke. The family lived at Priory Farm, Maxstoke, where his father was a farmer. William attended the Coleshill Grammar School and later enlisted in the 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line, at Warwick (service number 2557). Private Tyacke first served in Egypt on 12th September 1915. He was killed in action in Egypt on 9th January 1917 and is buried in the Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt. Private Tyacke was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British medals. He is also remembered on the Communion Table in Coleshill United Church.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-05 21:15:49
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 20th January 1917 DEATHS TYACKE – On the 9th inst., killed in action, Private W H Tyacke, of Warwickshire Yeomanry, with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force, youngest and dearly-loved son of Mr and Mrs R Tyacke, of ‘The Priory,’ Maxstoke, Coleshill, age 21 years.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-07-09 17:00:28

Name: Wallis
Year Of Birth:
Unit: Army Service Corps
Rank: Staff Sergeant
Date Of Death: 6/6/1917

Name: Frederick Watkins
Year Of Birth: 1897
Unit: 317th Construction Coy, Royal Engineers
Rank: Pioneer
Date Of Death: 8/7/1918
Notes: Frederick Watkins was born in 1875 in Coleshill. The son of William and Ann Watkins, Frederick lived at 167, 123, 129 Coventry Road, Coleshill with his family before getting married on 20 October 1906. He lived with his wife, Florence, at Post Office Yard and worked as a farm labourer before his enlistment on 15th November 1915. Initially joining ‘C’ company, 11th (Service) Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service number 503950), he was later transferred to 317th Construction Company, Royal Engineers service number, WR/30834. He died on 8th July 1918 and is buried in Coleshill Cemetery.
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:29:42
Notes: Ex-Soldiers Death At Home. Pioneer Frederick Watkins (43). Royal Engineers, who was discharged from the army about three weeks ago, died at his residence, High Street, Coleshill, on Monday. Previous to his enlisting in 1916 he was employed at the Birmingham Drainage Board Works, Minworth. He was wounded while serving in France with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and afterwards was transferred to the Royal Engineers. Much sympathy is felt for the widow, who is left with six small children. The funeral took place at Coleshill on Thursday afternoon. The coffin was covered with the Union Jack, and there were a number of beautiful floral tributes. Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, July 13, 1918.
Notes added by: dr on 2014-02-20 11:34:51
Notes: Service Numbers from his Medal Card, Service & Pension Records: - 15660, 503950, WR/30834
Notes added by: John Perry on 2014-02-22 22:12:12
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 22nd July 1916 “Private F. Watkins, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, of High Street, Coleshill, has been wounded in France, and is now in hospital in this country.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-29 17:25:24
Notes: You can enter your information here regarding this person. Sarah ann was Frederick's sister not his mother. His mother was Ann Watkins. Frederick was my grandfather.
Notes added by: Naomi Abel on 2015-10-07 20:30:33

Name: Thomas Webster
Year Of Birth: 1894
Unit: 2nd Battalion Canadian Pioneers
Rank: Pioneer
Date Of Death: 16/9/1916

Name: Henry Whinnery
Year Of Birth: 1887
Unit: 2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment and Durham Light Infantry
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 2/7/1917
Notes: Commemorated on the plaque at the Roman Catholic Church. Henry Whinnery (Whenary) was born in Middlesboroughin 1887. He was the son of Catherine Whenary. They are both recorded living in the Middlesborough Union Workhouse in 1891. By 1901 Henry was living in the St Pauls Home, Coleshill, and was working as a half time Boot and Shoemaker. He enlisted in Birmingham to the South Staffordshire Regiment (service number 3/6848). Private Whenary is recorded as an Infantry Soldier in the 2nd Battalion South Staffs Regiment on the 1911 census, living at Whittington Barracks, Whittington, Lichfield. He transferred to the Durham Light Infantry (service number 70624) and first served in France on the 29th September 1915. Private Whenary was killed in action on 3rd July 1917 and is remembered in the Philisophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France. He was awarded the 1915 Star, British and Victory medals.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-09 21:48:15

Name: Gilbert Bennell Willdey
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment
Rank: Private
Date Of Death: 15/7/1916
Notes: Gilbert Bennell Willdey was born in 1896 in Water Orton to parents William and Hannah. He attended the Coleshill Grammar School before enlisting in the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service number 16044). Gilbert enlisted at Colchester in Essex after the outbreak of war. Private Willdey was killed in action on the 15th July 1916, aged 19 years. He has no known grave and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, France. Private Willdey was posthumously awarded the Allied Victory and British War medals and is remembered on the Coleshill Grammar School Memorial in the Coleshill School.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-04 21:12:10
Notes: Birmingham Daily Post 3rd July 1917 Private Gilbert Bennell Willdey (19), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of Mr and Mrs W T Willdey, ‘The Chestnuts’, Water Orton, reported missing July 15, 1916, now officially presumed killed on that date.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-04 21:12:52
Notes: Birmingham Daily Post 15th July 1918 IN MEMORIAM WILLDEY – In most loving and ever-present memory of our dear and only son Gilbert, who made the great sacrifice in the Somme advance, July 15, 1916, aged 19. R.I.P.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-11-04 21:13:37

Name: John Dyott Willmot
Year Of Birth: 1896
Unit: 6th Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment
Rank: Lieutenant
Date Of Death: 3/7/1915
Notes: John Dyott Willmot was the eldest son of George Dyott Willmot J.P. (Land Agent and Surveyor) and Nellie P. Willmot of Blythe Cottage, Coleshill. John was born in King’s Norton, Birmingham, but by 1901 the family were living on Blythe Road, Coleshill. John served with the 6th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment (a Training Battalion), which was stationed at Worcester at the outbreak of the First World War, and on mobilisation moved to Plymouth. On 21st October 1914 John became a Second Lieutenant (on probation), and was confirmed at this rank on 10th March 1915. At the time of his death he had become a Lieutenant. John Dyott Willmot was killed in action in France on 3rd July 1915, aged just 19 years. He received the British, Victory and Star medals and is commemorated in the Beuvry Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. John’s younger brother was also killed in WW1 (see database entry for Robert Dyott Willmot). George Dyott Willmot was the chairman of the Finance Committee who organised the erection of the Coleshill War Memorial in 1921. George and his wife Nellie each gave £50 toward the cost of the Memorial, and in total £477 was raised by the community.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-03-27 14:46:51
Notes: The Birmingham Daily Mail - Wednesday 07 July 1915 LIEUTENANT J. D. WILLMOT KILLED News has been received of the death in action in France of Lieutenant John Dyott Willmot, the eldest son Mr. George Dyott Willmot, of Coleshill. Lieutenant Willmot was in his 20th year. He joined the 6th Worcestershire Battalion (Officers’ Reserve) last October, and left for France in January, as a subaltern attached to the 2nd Worcesters. In his school days he was known as a great athlete, and at Malvern College, where he went from Mr. J. G. Bradshaw’s Preparatory School at Packwood Hough, he won the open high jump in 1913 and 1914 and the long jump in 1914. He was in Mr. P. R. Farren’s house at Malvern, and became a School Prefect. He was a member of the Officers’ Training Corps at the College.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-06 15:37:46
Notes: Tamworth Herald 10th July 1915 ROLL OF HONOUR WILLMOT – On the 2nd inst.,[sic] killed in action in France, Lieutenant John Dyott Willmot, of the 6th Worcestershire Regiment (attached 2nd), eldest and dearly loved son of Mr and Mrs George Dyott Willmot, Coleshill, Warwickshire, in his 20th year.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-04-06 15:46:44
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 10th July 1915 LIEUT. J. D. WILLMOT KILLED ROYAL MESSAGE OF SYMPATHY News was received on Monday evening of the death in action on July 3rd of Lieutenant John Dyott Willmot, the eldest son of Mr George Dyott Willmot, of Coleshill. Lieutenant Willmot was in his 20th year. He joined the 6th Worcestershire Battalion (Officer’s Reserve) last October, and left for France in January, as a subaltern attached to the 2nd Worcesters. He was invalided home owing to an accident, but returned to the front after a few weeks. In his school days he was known as a great athlete, and at Malvern College, where he went from Mr J G Bradshaw’s Preparatory School at Packwood Hough, he won the open high jump in 1913 and 1914 and the long jump in 1914. He was in Mr P R Farrant’s house at Malvern, and became a School Prefect. He was a member of the Officers’ Training Corps at the College. Mr and Mrs Willmot received a telegram from Buckingham Palace as follows:- “The King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of your son in the service of this country. Their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow.”
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2014-05-04 16:05:19
Notes: Coleshill Chronicle 24th October 1914 MILITARY – Mr J D Willmot, eldest son of Mr G D Willmot, Blythe Cottage, Coleshill, has just received his commission in the 6th Battalion Worcester Regiment, Colonel Smith in command. The regiment will shortly take their place in connection with the western coast defences. Mr Willmot was formerly in the Malvern College Officers’ Training Corps.
Notes added by: Jane Veevers on 2015-05-24 10:27:00

Name: Robert Dyott Willmot
Year Of Birth: 1898
Unit: 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps
Rank: 2nd Lieutenant
Date Of Death: 17/2/1918
Notes: ‘It is with profound regret we record that second-lieutenant Robert Dyott Wilmot, 2nd Battalion, Kings Royal Rifles, younger and only surving son of Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Wilmot, Blyth Cottage, Coleshil, was killed in action on February 17th in France. Second-Lieutenant Wilmot was educated at Mr. Bradshaw's Packwood Hough, Warwickshire, and at Malvern College. During the time he was at Malvern he rose to the high position of second school prefect, and for a short period of one term acted as head of the school. He proved himself a capable cadet officer of the O.T.C., and was head of his house. While at school he obtained his house colours, both at cricket and football, and was a member of the school second eleven at football. By his cheery disposition and manly straight-forwardness he endeared himself to all those with whom he came in contact, and his loss is deplored by many. In all his school life, and in all that he took up during that period, his motto was "Thorough," and he proves himself the staunchest and most loyal of friends. His Major quotes from the official brigade report: "The battalion has lost a very gallant officer in Second-Lieutenant Wilmot, who, only a boy, had shown much promise, and was greatly beloved by his men". His elder brother Lieut. J.D. Wilmot, 6th Battalion, Worcester Regiment, Sp. R., was killed in action on July 8th 1915. The loss of both sons in the war is a tragedy which is keenly felt throughout the district, and universal sympathy has been expressed with Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot. They are bearing a great sacrifice through this world conflict. Their only sons, both under the age of twenty, have fallen on the battlefield of France, and as commandants of the Vicarage Hospital, Coleshill they themselves have devoted an enormous wealth of time and energy for the benefit of wounded soldiers who have passed through the hospital. Their daughter has been nursing in the V.A.D. Hospitals since the beginning of the war, and was recently mentioned in the honours list for her services.’ Extract from the Coleshill Chronicle, Saturday, March 2, 1918
Notes added by: SFT on 2014-02-16 20:30:17

Name: Walter Woodfield
Year Of Birth: 0
Unit: 238th Army Troops Coy., Royal Engineers
Rank: Sapper
Date Of Death: 26/3/1918

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